Balloon framing


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balloon framing

[bə′lün ‚fram·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
Framing for a building in which each stud is one piece from roof to foundation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Balloon framing

A system of framing a wooden building wherein all vertical studs in the exterior bearing walls and partitions extend the full height of the frame from sill to roof plate; the floor joists are supported by sills.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

balloon framing, balloon frame

balloon framing
A system of framing a wooden building; all vertical structural elements of the exterior bearing walls and partitions consist of single studs which extend the full height of the frame, from the top of the sole-plate to the roof plate; all floor joists are fastened by nails to studs. Compare with braced framing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
([dagger])([dagger]) Professor Ted Cavanagh of Dalhousie University argues that balloon framing was not invented by George Washington Snow or Augustine Taylor as Chicagoans tell it, but that its origins are distinctly French.
When nails became more easily available and circular saws were developed to cut smaller dimension lumber more efficiently, timber framing fell by the wayside to be replaced by the studded walls of balloon framing.
And in the area of architecture, we are confronted with terms like flying buttress, balloon framing and ziggurat.