Web browser choice screen

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Web browser choice screen

An earlier selection screen in Windows that enabled users to select a default browser from most of the available browsers on the market. Also known as the "ballot screen," it was accessed automatically from Internet Explorer in Windows computers sold in Europe as part of a 2009 settlement in the European Union/Microsoft antitrust case. However, it was also a useful Web page for Windows users to learn about other browsers and install them.


Some of the Choices
Users could select a popular browser such as Firefox, Chrome, Safari or Opera, but also from lesser-known browsers such as these. The choices were updated periodically.
References in periodicals archive ?
With Internet Explorer facing strong competition from Google and Mozilla, a browser ballot screen that is no more, and a new OS on the horizon, Internet Explorer is in a place where it needs a big showing with Windows 10 to make sure that its market share remains ahead of the competition, neowin reported.
Windows' ballot screen, which is supposed to give European users of Microsoft's
The browser ballot screen was set as a requirement by the Commission after Microsoft was found to have breached European Union competition laws by bundling Internet Explorer browser with the Windows OS.
Microsoft acknowledged its error and restored the ballot screen (see Europolitics 4485).
This takes the form of a ballot screen that is shown the first time you open Word, although asking homeusers to make a choice between Microsoft's Open XML and the rival OpenDocument format with little or no explanation is a bit ridiculous if you ask me.
Seemingly anxious to avoid having to produce a standalone European version of Windows, Microsoft suggested in August that it would install the ballot screen allowing choice between IE 8 and rival browsers.
Microsoft has revamped the browser ballot screen demanded by European Union antitrust regulators and may get final approval as early as Dec.
Several worried about the complexity of changing the version of Windows that we ship in Europe if our ballot screen proposal is ultimately accepted by the Commission and we stop selling Windows 7 E," Heiner added.
Microsoft has proposed a consumer ballot screen as a solution to the pending antitrust case about the tying of Microsoft Internet Explorer Web browser with Windows," it said in a statement.
The Commission launched formal proceedings, on 17 July, in response to complaints by competitors over the absence of the multi-choice ballot screen in these versions of Windows, which is supposed to be made available to give users a choice among different browsers (see Europolitics 4467).
In a concession to the Commission's concerns, Microsoft then on June 24 announced it would offer the ballot screen plan.
That decision obliged Microsoft not to impose its browser, Internet Explorer, but to give users the choice from March 2010 until 2014 via a ballot screen offering a choice of 12 browsers (see Europolitics 3925).