ballroom dancing


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ballroom dancing

social dancing, popular since the beginning of the 20th century, to dances in conventional rhythms (ballroom dances) such as the foxtrot and the quickstep
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kendra Murphy said: "Television has really put people's minds to learning ballroom dancing - people of all ages.
The idea is part of the British Dance Council's Everyone Born to Dance initiative to nurture ballroom dancing in schools.
I always thought the little ballroom dancing I had seen looked effortlessly easy.
From April 5 - 8 the Gleneagle Hotel will host a ballroom dancing extravaganza with George and Kay Devlin offering expert tuition, competitions and exhibition dancing.
The self-confessed owner of two left feet follows Peter and Anna to find out if it really is murder on the dancefloor with contestants at the All-Ireland Ballroom Dancing Championships in Carlow.
One man says he had tried skydiving but "most satisfying in the last three months is beginner ballroom dancing.
Originally, yes, ballroom dancing was for privileged and folk dancing for lower classes.
The TV show "Dancing with the Stars" has spurred a renewed interest in ballroom dancing, according to Nancy J.
Tower manager, Vicky Sherwin, said: "We're delighted that ballroom dancing is back at the Tower.
After watching the film "Mad Hot Ballroom" - a popular documentary about inner city kids discovering themselves as they learn how to dance merengue, rumba, tango, the foxtrot and swing - ballroom dancing was all 7-year-old Jaya Crow could talk about.
Meanwhile, granny moves to a new old folks home and George's parents (Jack Shepherd and Gemma Jones) take up ballroom dancing.