ballroom dancing


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ballroom dancing

social dancing, popular since the beginning of the 20th century, to dances in conventional rhythms (ballroom dances) such as the foxtrot and the quickstep
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References in periodicals archive ?
"I don't see the craze in ballroom dancing abating at all," asserts Anton.
"Ballroom dancing has definitely come out of the doldrums, and I think that is down to such programmes as Strictly Come Dancing," said Andrea, who also runs her own dance school and runs Arabesque with Colleen Simms.
The idea is part of the British Dance Council's Everyone Born to Dance initiative to nurture ballroom dancing in schools.
The self-confessed owner of two left feet follows Peter and Anna to find out if it really is murder on the dancefloor with contestants at the All-Ireland Ballroom Dancing Championships in Carlow.
Photo: Ballroom dancing is still popular all around the world.
Originally, yes, ballroom dancing was for privileged and folk dancing for lower classes.
He said: "Like New York, there are a lot of nationalities and cultures in Birmingham but ballroom dancing can help break down barriers and treats everyone as equal.
The TV show "Dancing with the Stars" has spurred a renewed interest in ballroom dancing, according to Nancy J.
Dance studios - and ballroom dancing in general - are experiencing a resurgence in interest that has not been seen in the United States since the first half of the past century.
BALLROOM dancing is tougher than rugby, according to teenage champ Kyle Taylor.
Simply Ballroom brings the glitzy world of ballroom dancing to the theatre with glittering costumes and stylish performances.
IT HAS been the most amazing revival since Lazarus - suddenly ballroom dancing is back and in spectacular fashion.