balsam fir

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balsam fir,

common name for the evergreen tree Abies balsamea of NE North American boreal forests. It has small needles and cones and is used for lumber. It is also called Canada balsamCanada balsam,
yellow, oily, resinous exudation obtained from the balsam fir. It is an oleoresin (see resin) with a pleasant odor but a biting taste. It is a turpentine rather than a true balsam.
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, as is the resin it produces, which is used as an adhesive in optical lenses and glass slides. Balsam fir is classified in the division PinophytaPinophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called gymnosperms. The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Pinopsida, order Coniferales, family Pinaceae.
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balsam fir

A softwood tree with coarse-grained wood, used for interior trim. See also: Wood
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are four balsam fir bed rails that will carry the mattress.
* 4 balsam fir side rails--84 inches long, 4-5 inches in diameter
* 4 balsam fir bed rails to carry mattress--80 inches long, 4-5 inches in diameter
There, wolves prey on moose, which munch extensively on balsam fir foliage.
Site description,--All study sites contained aspen in monoculture or in mixture with balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) or northern hardwood species such as paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), sugar and red maple (Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer rubrum L.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and basswood (Tilia americana L.).
Each study site was then placed into a cover-type group based on the proportion of these overstory species groups: Aspen ([greater than]0.9 basal area in aspen), Aspen-Conifer ([greater than]0.15 basal area in conifer species, mostly balsam fir) and Aspen-Hardwood ([greater than]0.15 basal area in hardwood species other than aspen, Table 1).
Nevertheless, from Maine to Labrador, headlands and islands wear manes of pigmy white spruce and balsam fir. I've seen seaside thickets so dense and wind-pruned one could clamber across them without falling through.
The dark, leathery needles looked like balsam fir, but without seeing a cone, I couldn't be sure.