Banality

(redirected from banal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Banality

 

in feudal Western Europe, the monopolistic right of a feudal lord to demand that his serfs mill grain, bake bread, press grapes, and perform other duties exclusively in the mill, oven, and winepress belonging to the lord. The feudal lord extracted requisitions in kind from the peasants—flour, wine, and so forth—or, later, money payments for the right to perform these economic operations on his manor.

References in periodicals archive ?
Should they have sought the strangeness of such admittedly banal forms as "ev'ry" and "maketh"?
The challenge he faced in writing the history of France in the 1930s was to explain how problems which were so petty, so repeated, so deep-rooted - finally, so banal - brought such tragedy.
In a line from an old, perhaps banal, hymn, "How dark without Mary life's journey would be.
Apartment hunters faced with dismally banal upended shoe boxes, with low ceilings and dining alcoves, often assume that the good apartments went the way of peeled grapes and top hats.
The only condition: be it cubism, literary minimalism, or rock and roll, a style borrowed from the West must be sufficiently banal to be useful.
No longer satisfied with now banal visions of drag queens, Waters plots against his audience, surprising them with "drag kings.
I read other critics call the show (fronted by Matt Baker and Sophie Raworth) a patronising, shallow, drab, banal, boring, dumbed-down pointless waste of licence-payers' money aimed at simpletons.
Six Degrees'' is an admittedly ambitious series that seeks to connect disparate souls with one another through means both spiritual and banal.
The artists show equal affection toward both avant-garde and kitsch--whether in the way the work incorporates the readymade (Holloway), subsumes itself to the functional (Pardo), or simply alludes to the banal (Calame).
But such inexplicable massiveness seems to work in such a place even as it bludgeons that place with its banal weight.
He criticised the largely 'metropolised self-appointed elite' who have the elevated the banal and the ordinary.
The wisdom can be trite and banal, such as "love is everywhere" and "don't hesitate," yet there are some lovely sayings such as "once you've said it, let it go," and the Dalai Lama telling you "through money or power you cannot solve all problems.