band course

band course

[′band ‚kȯrs]
(analytical chemistry)

belt course

belt course
1. A horizontal band of masonry extending horizontally across the façade of a building and occasionally encircling the entire perimeter; usually projects beyond the face of the building and may be molded or richly carved. Also called a stringcourse or band course; called a sill course if set at windowsill level.
2. A horizontal board across front face or around a building, often having a molding.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Since we introduced the Brass Band course 10 years ago, the Royal Welsh College Brass Band has grown in strength and ability year on year," said conductor Dr Robert Childs.
I have recently started a grade nine beginner band course in this fashion, using familiar riffs as a sort of method.
Alternatively, if you already play an instrument why not join the training band course? The two courses will culminate in a performance on Saturday February 20 in Brighouse Civic Hall where those who have been on the courses will feature alongside Yorkshire Co-op Brass Band in a concert called Show Music.
Melissa, 27, cast a spell over rocker Mark, lead singer with US band Course Of Nature, when they met in May last year.
"Alternatively, if you already play an instrument why not join in our training band course?" they said.
The three storeys each have band courses at .oor levels and distinctive wood mullion and transom windows with keystones and brick arches.
It's a particularly fine example of the "Tudorbethan" designs popular among the well-off at the time - red brick walls interrupted by freestone band courses with dressed stone surrounds to the windows, a tiled roof and chimneys that reach for the sky.
Schools using 4x4 plans or other models that do away with year-long classes must address other concerns, such as what to do about Advanced Placement and band courses. Supporters of band programs say they must be offered year-round, but that would result in students taking two credits of band each year.