Bandage


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bandage

[′ban·dij]
(building construction)
A strap, band, ring, or chain placed around a structure to secure and hold its parts together, as around the springing of a dome.
(electricity)
Rubber ribbon about 4 inches (10 centimeters) wide for temporarily protecting a telephone or coaxial splice from moisture.
(medicine)
A strip of gauze, muslin, flannel, or other material, usually in the form of a roll, but sometimes triangular or tailed, used to hold dressing in place, to apply pressure, to immobilize a part, to support a dependent or injured part, to obliterate tissue cavities, or to check hemorrhage.

Bandage

 

a soft or rigid material used to secure a dressing on a wound (protective bandage), create pressure on a part of the body to halt venous bleeding (pressure bandage), or keep an injured part of the body, usually an extremity, in the necessary position (immobilizing bandage).

Protective and pressure bandages are usually applied from a roll of gauze over a sterile dressing of gauze or cotton placed on a wound. Several types of protective bandages can be used, depending on the topography of the part of the body to be bandaged. Examples are circular, figure-of-8, and spica bandages. Cleol (a composite of rosin, ethyl alcohol, ether, and sunflower oil) and adhesive bandages can also be used to secure a dressing. An immobilizing bandage is ordinarily used for a fracture or extensive injury to soft tissue and can be made of wood, wire, or plastic. Such a bandage is called a splint, and the procedure for applying it splinting. The application of bandages is a first-aid procedure.

Inflatable coverings—pneumatic splints that uniformly encircle and immobilize the body—are used for prolonged and difficult transport of a victim (for example, from a mine) and for the immobilization of the extremities or the entire body. Plaster casts are commonly used for fractures.

V. F. POZHARISKII

What does it mean when you dream about a bandage?

The sense of being hurt, either physically or emotionally. It can also represent the sense of healing.

bandage

A strap, band, ring, or chain placed around a structure to secure and hold its parts together, as around the springing of a dome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The self-powered bandage generates an electric field over an injury and sends mild stimulation, in this way the time taken for the wound reduced.
Wisconsin [United States], December 27 ( ANI ): Researchers have built a new smart bandage that speeds up the healing process by sending electrical stimulation.
Weibo Cai, Xudong Wang and colleagues wanted to develop a flexible, self-powered bandage that could convert skin movements into a therapeutic electric field.
"I don't think the cost will be much more than a regular bandage," said one of the researchers.
If you get a cut or scrape, apply first-aid ointment, cover it with a bandage and leave it untended to heal for a few days Exposure to fresh air is the quickest way to allow wounds to heal, so it's best not to apply creams or ointments since they will just keep the wound moist.
4 Bandage. Place nonstick gauze or a Telfa pad directly over the cut.
A CORPORATE team from Birmingham which has raised an incredible PS3,161 for Birmingham Children's Hospital Charity has now pledged its support for the charity's fifth annual fundraiser - The Big Bandage.
Summary: Herve was the man who gave us the Bandage Dress.
IYou've heard of Band Aid, well here's Bandage Aid - and over 30,000 people from across the West Midlands took part.
NEW YORK--Bandage suppliers continue to make tweaks to the flexible, adhesive gauze bandage, introducing features that they say make the strips more effective to use and more essential to consumers.
COLLEAGUES at Sainsbury's Trinity Street store got involved in 'Big Bandage Day 2015' to support poorly children.
Another innovation in the bandage category has been launched by Aid-Tec, a start-up firm with offices in New Jersey and Israel.