bank holidays


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bank holidays,

days when the law requires that banks be closed. In the United States the list varies from state to state but generally includes, besides the major holidays, many days that are observed only by the banks and such government institutions as post offices. In England since 1871, bank holidays have had special significance as secular and perpetual holidays. The days include Christmas, Boxing Day (the first weekday after Christmas), Good Friday, Easter Monday, Whitmonday (the day after Pentecost), and the special banking day on the first Monday in August.
References in periodicals archive ?
A young woman enjoying time off work over the bank holiday weekend, but James Taylor questions the cost of bank holidays to businesses
As you enjoy another bank holiday, you are probably thinking "why don't we have more of them".
LUKE MITCHELL Good- As I work every Bank Holiday I see it as any other Monday with the added bonus of an extra day holiday.
Motorists should check signs carefully and unless the signs which set out parking charges or restrictions specifically say "except bank holidays", the controls will be in force over the coming public holidays.
Workers will have to wait until Christmas for the next bank holiday after today, a four-month gap which the TUC said should be filled with a new statutory day off.
So you should check your contracts because employers are not obliged to give the extra time and could choose to include bank holidays in statutory annual leave asgov.ukexplains.
After New Year's Day, the next bank holidays are Good Friday on April 19 and Easter Monday on April 22.
After Christmas and New Year, the spring and summer bank holidays in England and Wales in 2019 are Friday, April 19 (Good Friday), Monday, April 22 (Easter Monday), Monday, May 6 (Early May bank holiday), Monday, May 27 (Spring bank holiday) and Monday, August 26 (Summer bank holiday).