bar iron


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bar iron

[′bär ‚i·ərn]
(metallurgy)
Wrought iron formed into bars.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bar iron

A strong, malleable iron, available in the form of bars, which can be beaten into various shapes by blacksmiths to form tools, horseshoes, hardware, and highly decorative ironwork. See wrought iron.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The annual sales rate of bar iron fell by 23% to reach 616,660 tonnes due to lower production in the wake of a decline in demand locally and globally.
Although much of the output of the Caerphilly, Machen and Bassaleg works went to Melingriffith as "tin bar", for the production of tin plate, they still supplied bar iron to Bristol.
Soon after coming to Birmingham in about 1699 the Welshman made his home in Edgbaston Street and became a wholesale supplier of bar iron, rods, and other metals to nail and hardware makers in the area.
Factory workers made bar iron and copper trinkets that were used by slave traders to buy African slaves.
He sold ironmongery to begin with - rat traps and tools and nails - before entering into partnership with John Turton at Perry Barr to produce bar iron. By the time of his will in 1757 he was describing himself as a wire-drawer.