Barbarisms


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Barbarisms

 

foreign words and expressions used in speech to describe realia, customs, and so forth of other peoples. Barbarisms may be incompletely assimilated by a language (semantically and sometimes even morphologically and syntactically). As a rule, they are used to express local color in designations of proper nouns (Jean, José), money (dollar, centime), posts and types of people (curé, mayor, gangster), details of everyday life, clothing, decoration, food, or titles (castanets, siuzane, redingote, sherbet, sir), and so on. They are also used to achieve a comic effect (“Avoue, don’t you have a connaissance with some sort of Frenchman?”—D. I. Fonvizin) and, in cases of foreign words, in the hope of displaying one’s education. Among barbarisms, exoticisms—descriptions of realia, usually taken from non-Indo-European languages such as giaour, aul, shalwar—are sometimes distinguished.

V. V. RASKIN

References in periodicals archive ?
The articles in this collection challenge the dichotomy set up by the title through an exuberant menagerie of barbarisms and barbarians and of humans, humanes, and humanisms.
Zsolt Almasi and Mike Pincombe (ed.), Writing the Other: Humanism versus Barbarism in Tudor England (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2008).
In 2006, Hungary's Pazmany Peter Catholic University in Piliscsaba hosted the Fifth International Conference of the Tudor Symposium under the topic of "Humanity and Barbarism in Tudor Literature." The recently published collection of essays generated by this meeting, Writing the Other: Humanism versus Barbarism in Tudor England, edited by Zsolt Almasi and Mike Pincombe, acts as a testament to what was evidently a lively and thoughtful event, neatly situated, as the volume points out, in what was considered in the English Tudor era to be the "frontier between Christians and the others, the human, humane and the barbarian" (1).
The gladiatorial opposition in the volume's subtitle, Humanism versus Barbarism, with a wink, evokes its dichotomy only to dismantle it as "naive boundaries...
Defining barbarism in terms of its relation to comprehensible language, as Matuska does, is a key feature of several of the collection's articles.
THE CLASH OF BARBARISMS THE MAKING OF THE NEW WORLD DISORDER By Gilbert Achcar published by Saqi Edited By Peter Drucker ISBN 0 86356 919 6 price 12.99 [pounds sterling] paperback
The war of aggression and occupation in Iraq led to blatant manifestations of western barbarism; most strikingly epitomised by the torture at Abu-Ghraib, and which, inevitably nurtured fanatical Islamic and other counter-barbarisms.