barb

(redirected from barbs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.
Related to barbs: tiger barbs

barb

1
1. any of the numerous hairlike filaments that form the vane of a feather
2. a beardlike growth in certain animals
3. a hooked hair or projection on certain fruits
4. any small cyprinid fish of the genus Barbus (or Puntius) and related genera, such as B. conchonius (rosy barb)
5. any of the small fleshy protuberances beneath the tongue in horses and cattle

barb

2
a breed of horse of North African origin, similar to the Arab but less spirited

barb

3
Austral a black kelpie (see kelpie)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

barb

[bärb]
(meteorology)
A means of representing wind speed in the plotting of a synoptic chart, being a short, straight line drawn obliquely toward lower pressure from the end of a wind-direction shaft. Also known as feather.
(vertebrate zoology)
A side branch on the shaft of a bird's feather.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At HH stages 39-40 in the chick large part of the feather filament (apical to more basal portions) was made of centrally located, keratinized barbs and by peripheral barbules (Figs.
Processed feather barbs could be useful in many more products.
The rest of the play consists of duologues that bring Barbs into sometimes barbed and often boisterous contact with a widowed mom, a gay best friend, a long-term ex and a boy toy who happens to be the son Barbs' aerobics partner Alice gave up for adoption.
Previously, it was reported that Christian Bables was to reprise his role as Barbs, for which he won a Best Supporting Actor award in the 2016 Metro Manila Film Festival.
The lowly barbed wire fence was the one thing that made that possible.
"We also show that males with long barbs cause more severe injuries to females, but also that these males have a greater rate of fertilization success," says Arnqvist.
When she altered the feathers so the lice that were a bit too plump to fit between the barbs, she found that the lice kept their grip.
wire began about 1879, primarily in response to cattlemen who claimed that the long, not-easily-seen barbs of the earlier wire were punishing livestock and providing entry for screwworm disease.
Unlike feathers on modern birds, they weren't differentiated into individual barbs that extended from a central shaft.