bare rock

bare rock

[¦ber ¦räk]
(navigation)
In U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey terminology, a rock extending above the plane of mean high water.
References in classic literature ?
On our right, over a shoulder of bare rock, I saw the level blue of the sea.
It is the country of the wolf and the isard, of the brown bear and the mountain-goat, a land of bare rock and of rushing water.
At night, just as the Northern Lights were winking and flashing through the fog, Kotick climbed a bare rock and looked down on the scattered nurseries and the torn and bleeding seals.
And it was very silent, too, as there were no birds to sing or squirrels to chatter, the trees being left far behind them and only the bare rocks remaining.
But the waves dashed foaming up among the bare rocks at her feet, mingling their cold spray with her tears, and gave no answer to her prayer.
Wadis turned to waterways and streets to streams as rains continued to disrupt routines, mostly in northern and eastern wadis, where the runoff from bare rock mountains funnels into ravines.
This is a coating of metallic minerals that are precipitated from the seawater on bare rock on the seabed.
Sir David told the magazine: "There was bare rock with water sluicing across it, and we all just sat in the tent on top of one another.
6 The path emerges from the trees onto the bare rock of Stormy Point.
In many areas, there are submerged creek beds, apparently the result of historic rise in sea levels (yep, it was occurring 10,000 years ago, too) that are fish highways, particularly where they make bends or meet side creeks, or expose bare rock or caves.
Up the hill from Methelin Bay's sandy beach, I climb down to water through invasive casuarina and Mexican pepper followed by bare rock surfaces infinitely water shaped into sharp little limestone mountain ranges the size of razors.