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bare

Descriptive of a piece of material which is smaller than the specified dimensions; scant.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a series of photos the visiting drummer is first seen bareheaded after her hijab fell off, before a woman in black appears on stage to return the garment, stopping the musician in her tracks.
The first of the three illustrations depicts two bearded, bareheaded icon painters under a canopy, which denotes their workshop (Fig.
During a series of turns, it flew off, and she danced the rest of the scene alongside her snowflake sisters as the single, conspicuously bareheaded flake -- a mortifying rookie mistake.
More women wear full face veils, and no women go about Hargeisa bareheaded as happened in the 1970s.
As quoted by William Dalrymple and Anita Anand in the book Kohinoor, finally the Nizam of Hyderabad, Asif Jah I, met Nader - bareheaded, with his hands tied with his turban, and begged him on his knees to stop the killings.
Not just a clerk, but one who is bareheaded and shuffling along in slippers.
In the dramatic scene of al-Mutawakkil's pilgrimage where his guards spot a bareheaded man circumambulating the House, cursing al-Mutawakkil, the dialogue is translated in terse, running prose.
It was snowing and cold, and Gottwald was bareheaded. Bursting with solicitude, Clementis took off his fur hat and set it on Gottwald's head.
Now the university person is walking directly under us, bareheaded, no hard hat, you'd think he was at the beach.
Newsmen cared more for the color of Eisenhower's coat (dark blue) and whether he would wear a top hat (he reviewed the parade bareheaded) than for what were becoming routine acts of aerial "aggression." (28) In addition, the American diplomatic response was muted largely due to the office changeovers leaving a relative power vacuum until the newcomers learned their positions.
"Instead of helmets, the men went bareheaded or put on [ornamental] stocking caps," he writes.
It's also an ancient Arab tradition to cover the head - in the good old days, going out bareheaded was like going out naked: Not only bad fashion, but humiliating and offensive.