barge


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barge,

large boat, generally flat-bottomed, used for transporting goods. Most barges on inland waterways are towed, but some river barges are self-propelled. There are also sailing barges. On the Great Lakes and in the American coastal trade, huge steel barges are used for transporting bulk cargoes such as coal. Large flat-bottomed barges called lighters are used for transporting cargo to or from a vessel that cannot be berthed at a pier or dock; LASH (for lighter-aboard ship) vessels are equipped to receive and unload lighters on board and thus reduce the time spent in port. Barge towing, done in the past by men or by horses or mules, is now accomplished mostly by steam or motor tugboat or by other, self-propelled barges. In use since the dawn of history, barges were common on the Nile in ancient Egypt. Some were highly decorated and used for carrying royalty; use of such state barges persisted in Europe until modern times.

barge

[bärj]
(naval architecture)
A large cargo-carrying craft which is towed or pushed by a tug on both seagoing and inland waters.

barge

1. a vessel, usually flat-bottomed and with or without its own power, used for transporting freight, esp on canals
2. a vessel, often decorated, used in pageants, for state occasions, etc.
3. Austral informal a heavy or cumbersome surfboard
References in classic literature ?
At Selkirk, the old team of dogs, fresh and in condition, were harnessed, and the same day saw Daylight plodding on, alternating places at the gee-pole, as a matter of course, with the Le Barge Indian who had volunteered on the way out.
The Le Barge Indian was a young man, unlearned yet in his own limitations, and filled with pride.
He saw two great open barges being filled up with men, and, on inquiry, learned that these were grubless ones being rounded up and sent down the Yukon by the Committee of Safety.
Running in cake-ice all the way, and several times escaping jams in the Yukon Flats, the barges made their hundreds of miles of progress farther into the north and froze up cheek by jowl with the grub-fleet.
He rides to where the barges lie in readiness, and the great Barons step forth from their ranks to meet him.
Slowly the heavy, bright-decked barges leave the shore of Runningmede.
The pack flew off the barge in every direction, and, after gambols, dug like terriers at Abu Hussein's many earths.
Farag waved his hand to his uncle, and led Royal on to the barge.
These gigantic walls, diminished every tide by the barges for Belle-Isle were, in the eyes of the musketeer, the consequence and the proof of what he had well divined at Pirial.
We flashed past barges, steamers, merchant-vessels, in and out, behind this one and round the other.
In one of these barges sat the Queen of that country with her only daughter, a maiden more beautiful than the Day Star, and attended by the ladies of the Court.
Towards noon whales were raised; but so soon as the ship sailed down to them, they turned and fled with swift precipitancy; a disordered flight, as of Cleopatra's barges from Actium.