barge

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barge,

large boat, generally flat-bottomed, used for transporting goods. Most barges on inland waterways are towed, but some river barges are self-propelled. There are also sailing barges. On the Great Lakes and in the American coastal trade, huge steel barges are used for transporting bulk cargoes such as coal. Large flat-bottomed barges called lighters are used for transporting cargo to or from a vessel that cannot be berthed at a pier or dock; LASH (for lighter-aboard ship) vessels are equipped to receive and unload lighters on board and thus reduce the time spent in port. Barge towing, done in the past by men or by horses or mules, is now accomplished mostly by steam or motor tugboat or by other, self-propelled barges. In use since the dawn of history, barges were common on the Nile in ancient Egypt. Some were highly decorated and used for carrying royalty; use of such state barges persisted in Europe until modern times.

barge

[bärj]
(naval architecture)
A large cargo-carrying craft which is towed or pushed by a tug on both seagoing and inland waters.

barge

1. a vessel, usually flat-bottomed and with or without its own power, used for transporting freight, esp on canals
2. a vessel, often decorated, used in pageants, for state occasions, etc.
3. Austral informal a heavy or cumbersome surfboard
References in periodicals archive ?
On 14 October 2013 the Company announced the results of the Niger River Barging Study, which was conducted by South African port and costal engineering consultants Prestedge Retief Dresner Wijnberg (Pty) Ltd ("PRDW").
Tampa-based UMG took over UBL in 2007 and has since then developed it as a provider of barging services to the local and export markets of dry bulk commodities such as coal, petroleum coke and grain.
SeaTac Marine Services LLC is a Seattle-based marine logistics company that specializes in barging of material.
Phil Bedwell, in charge of OmniSource's barging segment, says that if a scrap or steel company feels it is going to have a good year, it can put in a guaranteed contract to lock in barges for the year.