barium nitrate


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barium nitrate

[′bar·ē·əm ′nī‚trāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Ba(NO3)2 A toxic salt occurring as colorless, cubic crystals, melting at 592°C, and soluble in water; used as a reagent, in explosives, and in pyrotechnics. Also known as nitrobarite.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 28, 2019-: Barium Nitrate Market 2019 Global Trend, Segmentation And Opportunities Forecast To 2025
Barium compounds, such as barium chloride, barium nitrate, or barium hydroxide, that dissolve easily in water usually do not last in these forms for a long time in the environment.
Primer mixtures often contain three inorganic compounds: lead styphnate (initiator), antimony sulfide (fuel), and barium nitrate (oxidizer) (Wolten et al.
They did not indicate why the suspect had been making explosives, which were shipped from Liaoning to Ningbo and contained aluminium powder and barium nitrate. The explosion happened after his relatives took the material to the site on Saturday, the statement said.
Yellowish green colors come from the compound barium chloride; barium nitrate gives a brighter green.
While these studies are internally consistent and point towards a general understanding, there remain questions regarding the applicability of the computational model as semi- infinite crystal surfaces are taken to model the active catalyst, which suggests that NOx reacted with B2+ to produce barium nitrate Ba(NO3)2.
et al [12] in 2005 researched that barium compounds (barium oxide, barium acetylacetonate, barium nitrate) had been used as catalysts for the liquid-phase oxidation of ethyl benzene with molecular oxygen.
Lead, brass and other metals from ammunition along with all the constituents of the propellants, including trinitrotoluene, picric acid, diphenylamine, nitrocellulose, nitroglycerin, potassium nitrate, barium nitrate, tetracene, diazodintrophenol, phosphorus, peroxides, thiocarbamide, potassium chlorate, vinyl fluoride, vinyl chloride, sodium fluoride and sodium sulfate.
The German firm of RWS developed a non-corrosive primer in 1901 and the Swiss in 1911 by substituting barium nitrate in place of potassium chlorate.
This proof-of-principle device was only 20 percent as efficient as the best barium nitrate lasers.