baroclinic instability

baroclinic instability

[¦bar·ə¦klin·ik in·stə′bil·əd·ē]
(meteorology)
A hydrodynamic instability arising from the existence of a meridional temperature gradient (and hence of a thermal wind) in an atmosphere in quasi-geostrophic equilibrium and possessing static stability.
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Baroclinic instability generated through enhanced surface heat fluxes due to sea ice reduction promotes planetary wave activity in the troposphere and the troposphere-stratosphere interface that could potentially affect the atmospheric flow, and thus modify midlatitude weather and climate at the surface [see Cohen et al.
You earned the Sverdrup medal for your "theories of the general circulation and baroclinic instability." Would you translate?
The theory that describes these phenomena is called baroclinic instability.
The principal result is that increasing rotation causes barotropic/ baroclinic instability and flow meandering with an approximate time-scale of [T.sub.1] = [(fRo).sup.-1].
Videos using these and other rotating tables to teach specific concepts such as baroclinic instability are available on the DIYnamics YouTube channel--including some in Spanish.
At the middle school and Exploring Your Universe events, we also demonstrated baroclinic instability with our larger tank and GoPro setup, streaming the rotating tank footage in real time onto a classroom wall or to a handheld tablet.
This concept was later replaced by the baroclinic instability paradigm, which describes the development of a surface front as a consequence of the growing cyclone rather than its cause.
The shift away from the frontal discontinuity as the origin of cyclogenesis was supported by the theory of baroclinic instability (Charney 1947; Eady 1949), which explained the generation of extratropical cyclones in initially broad baroclinic zones without well-marked surface fronts.
However, in contrast to the stratospheric vortex, baroclinic instability (and the resulting waves) plays a key role in the variability and long-term maintenance of the large-scale tropospheric jet stream (Robinson 2006).
Given the reliance of subtropical storms on sustained convection to trigger moist baroclinic instability (Davis 2010), it is expected that the coupling index will provide an improved estimate of the thermodynamic limits on development.
A second course is often comprised from a number of chapters addressing quasigeostrophic (QG) theory, waves, the boundary layer, and baroclinic instability. The recent editions contain substantial content that will not be covered in a typical two-semester undergraduate dynamics sequence, yet is highly valuable as a reference during advanced graduate study.