Barricade

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barricade

[′bar·ə‚kād]
(engineering)
Structure composed essentially of concrete, earth, metal, or wood, or any combination thereof, and so constructed as to reduce or confine the blast effect and fragmentation of an explosion.

Barricade

 

an artificial obstacle of logs, sandbags, rocks, trees, and other materials at hand piled up across streets, roads, near bridges, on mountain passes, and so on. Barricades were used in the 13th and 14th centuries in the defense of Moscow, Riazan’, Vladimir, and other cities from the Mongol-Tatar hordes, in 1611 during the defense of Moscow from Polish invaders, and in the 17th and 18th centuries during the peasant wars led by Stepan Razin and Emel’ian Pugachev. Barricades were widely used during uprisings of the proletariat in Paris in 1827, 1830,1832, and 1834; in Brussels in 1830; in Lyon in 1834; in Prague and Berlin in 1848; and in Dresden in 1849. During the Paris Commune of 1871 bitter battles were fought on the barricades.

During the 1905 Revolution and the Great October Socialist Revolution in Russia the people in revolt used barricades widely in the fight against the tsarist troops. They were built on many streets of Moscow. During the Civil War of 1918–20 and the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45, barricades were built during the conduct of combat operations for certain cities.

M. G. ZHDANOV

barricade

An obstruction to deter the passage of persons or vehicles.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the barricade phenomenon exploded in France's 1830 Revolution, the idea internationalized when it spread to Belgium.
Thousands of people took to the streets of the capital, erecting barricades and setting fires, furious that government-backed candidate Jude Celestin, the protege of unpopular President Rene Preval, apparently will go on to a runoff vote while carnival singer Michel "Sweet Micky" Martelly finished third in official results and is probably eliminated.
Beyond the Barricade has been performed throughout the UK and Europe for the past decade, but this is the only tour date in West Yorkshire this year.
Because of this change, an estimated $67 million will be saved over the next 3 years through reductions in the height and footprint of barricades and the amount of dirt required for barricade construction.
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has officially identified longitudinal channelizing barricades as having the ability to alleviate the problem of gaps with traditional channelizing devices.
A crisis played out as a hostage/ barricade incident or suicide by cop constitutes a desperate act--an attempt at problem solving, however misdirected and unconstructive.
Les champs de bataille, les barricades, les "mauvais lieux" sont ainsi des rendezvous non seulement pour les personnages qui s'y retrouvent, mais aussi entre le discours de l'ordre etabli et ceux des forces qui s'opposent a cette autorite (entre le "discours dominant" et le "contre-discours" pour reprendre la terminologie de Terdiman).
REBEL farmers who have threatened to put up barricades to stop the slaughter of "healthy" animals were told yesterday that the cull will go ahead.
The 24-year-old is a father himself, but that does not stop him from coming to the barricades. He and his friends, slingshots at the ready, run up to the barricade of cement blocks and rubber tires to launch their shower of stones.
You know, the kind who marches and protests and shakes the establishment from behind barricades until it listens.
La representation de la barricade du 5 juin 1832 chez Hugo, comme plus tard celles des barricades de 1848 et de 1851 chez Flaubert, ou encore celle de la debacle de 1870 chez Valles ne sont plus des images d'un moment decisif et unique, ni des individus connus.
As per the police, barricades are set up at Kukranwala Adda ahead of Operation Bluestar anniversary on June 6.