baryonic matter


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Related to baryonic matter: dark matter, Baryons

baryonic matter

(ba-ree-on -ik) Normal matter containing baryons, i.e. protons and neutrons. It is thought that a large proportion of dark matter could be composed of nonbaryons, such as WIMPS.
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Baryonic matter is what makes up everything we can touch and see, (which is only about 5 percent of everything that exists in the universe, the remainder being the mysterious dark matter and dark energy) from the smallest atoms to the largest stars and galaxies, and according to theories around the Big Bang, a certain amount of it was created at the time the universe came into existence.
Let's assume that during our existence (1.3 x 1010 years) our galaxy has lost 4/5 of its baryonic matter due to the uniform radial radiation of superphotons on its inner spherical surface with a diameter of 105 light years.
MOND (Modified Newtonian Dynamics) theory is an alternative for the popular Dark Matter (DM) theory, which successfully explains the distribution of force in an astronomical object from observed distributions of baryonic matters [10].
The gravitational effects of the Nexus graviton manifest at large scales and for galaxies, these effects begin to manifest when the density of DE is equal to the density of baryonic matter as described by (16) or when the acceleration due to baryonic matter is equal and opposite to the acceleration due to the emission of the ground state graviton as described in [14].
Since the quantum mass is this large it is pointless to attempt to distinguish between dark and baryonic matter. The simulated particles are of dark matter, and the first evolved structures are the dark matter halos which contain the galaxies.
If her calculation is correct, it would account for the two-thirds of galaxies' baryonic matter that astronomers have been looking for, Werk said.
Galaxies form out of lumps of regular matter, so-called baryonic matter that is composed of atoms, and dark matter.
The 60 papers examine such topics as cold compressed baryonic matter with hidden local symmetry and holography, topological and curvature effects in a multi-fermion interaction model, continuum superpartners from supersymmetric unparticles, new regularization in extra dimensional model and renormalization group flow of the cosmological constant, and critical behaviors of sigma-mode and pion in holographic superconductors.
Measurements of extremely distant gas halos and galaxies indicate the baryonic matter present when the universe was only a few billion years old represented about one-sixth the mass and density of the existing unobservable, or dark, matter.
But Big Bang nucleosynthesis shows that baryonic matter can only account for a very small amount of the needed energy density to meet this requirement.
Comparing these models to the latest observations from the WMAP satellite, it had been concluded quite precisely that the Universe contained a mixture of 4% baryonic matter (all of the matter which made up everything we could see in the Universe), 26% dark matter, and 70% dark energy.