basal

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Related to basal bone: Vomer bone

basal

[′bā·səl]
(biology)
Of, pertaining to, or located at the base.
(physiology)
Being the minimal level for, or essential for maintenance of, vital activities of an organism, such as basal metabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Measurements Initial Premolar Molar Basal bone width (mm) 42.54 59.35 Cortical bone width (mm) 46.45 57.41 Midpalatal suture split 0 0 (mm) Tooth inclination (degree) 85.2[degrees] right 89.4[degrees] right 90.6[degrees] left 92.1[degrees] left Measurements After expansion Premolar Molar Basal bone width (mm) 46.84 62.38 Cortical bone width (mm) 50.88 60.51 Midpalatal suture split 3.14 2.06 (mm) Tooth inclination (degree) 86.5[degrees] right 90.3[degrees] right 91.5[degrees] left 93.8[degrees] left
(d) After nerve repositioning, a reciprocate saw was carefully used to conduct an osteotomy from the mental foramen to the retromolar region, to divide the lingual cortical bone from the basal bone, careful to avoid damage to the posterior teeth's apices.
A 41-year-old female patient was wounded by a ballistic trauma that caused the loss of teeth 4.3,4.2,4.1,3.1, and 3.2, the loss of a big portion of basal bone and gingiva in this area, and the loss of an eye (Figure 6).
This represented the mandibular basal bone height, MBH (Figure 1).
Therefore, both postural/functional asymmetries and parafunctions developed by a given patient could produce structural modifications of basal bone height; a parafunctional stimulus producing severe occlusal deterioration may eventually produce a reduction of maxillary basal bone height.
A female patient, 65 years old, nonsmoker, presenting a fixed partial denture to be restored in the posterior left maxillary region, with reduced basal bone height, was recruited.
In this process, the first bur that entered was a trephine 2 mm in diameter that removed the basal bone and grafted from the maxillary sinus to then continue with the milling protocol according to the manufacturer and the installation of the dental implant.
In terms of dental tissues alveolar bone loss can occur due to reasons such as trauma developmental problems untreatable endodontic problems and severe periodontal disease10 and is associated with a reduction in the apico-coronal and bucco-lingual dimensions of the alveolar ridge because the amount of force on the bone is decreased following tooth removal leading to disuse osteoporosis.1112 However the basal bone of the mandible is retained despite the tooth loss.
(1.) Gainsforth BL, Higley LB: A stydy of orthodontic anchorage possibility in basal bone, Am J Orthod.