basaluminite

basaluminite

[¦bās·ə′lüm·ə‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
Al4(SO4)(OH)10·5H2O A white mineral consisting of hydrated basic aluminum sulfate; occurs in compact masses.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carrero S, Fernandez-Martinez A, Perez-Lopez R, Nieto JM (2017) Basaluminite structure and its environmental implications.
Based on simulations during the correction of the pH possible solid phases formed include Fe(OH)3, [Fe.sub.3](OH)8, goethite (FeOOH), hematite and maghemite ([Fe.sub.2][O.sub.3]), magnetite ([Fe.sub.3][O.sub.4]), gibbsite (Al(OH)3), basaluminite [([Al.sub.4](OH).sub.10]S[O.sub.4]),boehmite and diaspore (AlOOH), jurbanite (AlOHS[O.sub.4]), U[O.sub.2][(OH).sub.2] and schoepite (U[O.sub.2][(OH).sub.2]*[H.sub.2]O), hausmannite, manganite, and pyrolusite.
Solubility diagrams were constructed using the equations for amorphous aluminium hydroxide, alunite, and AlOHS[O.sub.4] plus equations and p[K.sup.0] values from the literature for alunogen (Nordstrom 1982) and basaluminite (Adams and Rawajfih 1977).
These equations were used to produce diagrams of amorphous aluminium hydroxide, alunite, alunogen, basaluminite, gibbsite, and jurbanite solubility plus the observed constant [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in terms of pAl[(OH).sub.3] activity and sulfuric acid potential.
jarosite, K[Fe.sub.3][(OH).sub.6][(S[O.sub.4]).sub.2]; schwertmannite, [Fe.sub.l6][O.sub.16][(OH).sub.10][(S[O.sub.4]).sub.3]; and basaluminite, [Al.sub.4][(OH).sub.10]S[O.sub.4]).
(2002b) reported that synthetic basaluminite released -60% of acidity during 1 M KC1 extraction, in contrast to previously held views which reported that 1 M KC1 was unable to remove the acidity held in such minerals (Lin et al.
Among them are hydrobasaluminite and basaluminite [[Al.sub.4][(OH).sub.10]S[O.sub.4].4[H.sub.2]O] (the most common), together with zaherite [[Al.sub.12][(OH).sub.26][(S[O.sub.4]).sub.5.]20[H.sub.2]O] and aluminite [[Al.sub.2][(OH).sub.4](S[O.sub.4].7[H.sub.2]O].
They proposed that sulfate retention by acid soils might be a consequence of the insolubility of Fe and Al-hydroxy sulfates (such as basaluminite, alunite, and probably their Fe-analogues).
Basaluminite [Al.sub.4][SO.sub.4][(OH).sub.10]*5[H.sub.2]O
Wolt and Adams (1979) determined that sulfate in slightly soluble Al-hydroxy-sulfate (basaluminite) was highly available to cotton whereas sulfur in alunite was almost unavailable.