bascule

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bascule

1. a bridge with a movable section hinged about a horizontal axis and counterbalanced by a weight
2. a movable roadway forming part of such a bridge
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Bascule

A structure that rotates about an axis, as a seesaw, with a counterbalance equal to the weight of the structure at one end, used for movable bridges.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

bascule

[′ba‚skül]
(engineering)
A structure that rotates about an axis, as a seesaw, with a counterbalance (for the weight of the structure) at one end.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bascule

A structure that moves about a horizontal axis, as a seesaw, with a counterbalance at one end.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Cecal bascule: an unusual pathology of cecal dilation.
"Caecal Bascule: A Rare Cause of Intestinal Obstruction." Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences 2.49 (2013): 9525-527.
In the case we present, it is most likely that the caecal bascule developed as a complication of the post-caesarean section ileus, given its temporal concordance.
The cecal bascule. Am J Roentgenenol Radium Ther Nucl Med.
The Prince of Wales (who later became King Edward VII) opened the bascules to the sound of brass bands and the cheers of hundreds of thousands of spectators.
Today, London has 17 bridges spanning the Thames, but more than 10,000 commercial vehicles thunder across Tower Bridge each day, many of them 30-ton juggernauts, traveling on bascules designed for horses and carts.
On January 10, 1965 the bascules fully opened and dockside cranes dipped in salute as the body of Sir Winston Churchill was carried to its final resting place.
The bascule design, once called "one of the structural triumphs of this age of steel," has never failed to operate in its 100-year history.
Six years later, when a select committee of the House of Commons was discussing the Thames bridges, Jones resurrected the bascule bridge.
Each bascule weighed 1,000 tons and lay flat in the middle of the road between the towers until ships needed to sail to or from the Upper Pool.
Look down on buses whizzing over the bridge--and see the bascules being raised beneath you.