basilar

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Related to basilar artery: vertebral artery, Basilar Artery Migraine

basilar

[′bas·ə·lər]
(biology)
Of, pertaining to, or situated at the base.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The brain of the camel received its arterial blood supply from the basilar artery and the intracranial part of internal carotid artery, also known as cerebral carotid artery (Ocal et al.), which was represented by the rostral epidural rete mirabile (Fig.
In old people, when the head is tilted back, the basilar artery can get "nipped", classically causing "fall attacks" because blood to the brain is momentarily interrupted.
An angiogram confirmed that Garcia has thrombosis [formation of blood clot that obstructs blood flow] in his basilar artery, which is responsible of carrying oxygenated blood to his brainstem, Dr Al Sibaie explained.
Compared with conventional angiography, HR-MRI has some merits in delineating the vessel wall characterization because of its noninvasive and radiation-free properties (4) and is more accurate in delineating basilar artery stenosis and detecting plaque (19).
In addition, the results of the efficacy of IV rt-PA could be different if patients with all large vessel occlusions such as basilar artery, terminal or tandem ICA and MCA were included.
Whenever there is significantly reduced flow either in the ICA or basilar artery due to any reason, the cerebral perfusion is maintained by the collateral vessels like AcomAs and PcomAs.12 A study14 showed increased risk of stroke in cases of ICA occlusion with absent/hypoplastic PcomA.
Stefanadis, "Incidental aneurysms of aorta and basilar artery in patients with coronary artery ectasia.
In this fetal-type posterior circle of Willis, PCA originates directly from the ipsilateral internal carotid (ICA), with no connection with the basilar artery. Structural imaging scans demonstrated that complete agenesis of P1 and absence of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) maybe found unilaterally (in 4-26% subjects) or bilaterally (in 2-4% cases) [1, 2, 5, 6].
There was also a hypoattenuating area adjacent to the basilar artery, which represented active extravasation of blood into the already present subarachnoid blood products (Figure 2).
Magnetic resonance imaging brain showed ectatic and prominent right basilar artery, also multiple flow voids in the spinal canal anterior to the spinal cord and diagnosed to have MD.
Brain MRI confirmed bilateral vertebral artery hematoma, and MRA showed dissection of the right vertebral artery involving the whole V1, V2 and V3 segments, occluding the V4 segment, and dissection of the left artery involving the V3 segment with insufficient filling of the V4 segment and basilar artery. Daily neurosonologic monitoring showed enlargement of the hematoma in size and length in both vertebral arteries (Fig.
The supraorbital keyhole approach effectively exposes the frontal lobe base, anterior clinoid process, canalis opticus, olfactory sulcus, olfactory tract, optic nerve, optic chiasm, oculomotor nerve, anterior communicating artery, anterior cerebral artery A1 segment, pituitary stalk, diaphragma sellae, dorsum sellae, posterior clinoid process, basilar artery apex, posterior cerebral artery P1 segment, superior cerebellar artery proximal, front upper pontine and interpeduncular cistern, anteromedial temporal lobe, internal carotid, middle cerebral artery (M1, M2 segment, and part of M3 segment), anterior choroidal artery, posterior communicating artery; and contralateral carotid artery medial surface, anterior cerebral artery A1 and A2 proximal, middle cerebral artery M1 and M2 proximal.