basilica

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basilica

(bəsĭl`ĭkə), large building erected by the Romans for transacting business and disposing of legal matters. Rectangular in form with a roofed hall, the building usually contained an interior colonnade, with an apse at one end or at each end. The central aisle tended to be wide and was higher than the flanking aisles, so that light could penetrate through the clerestory windows. The oldest known basilica was built in Rome in 184 B.C. by the elder Cato. Other early examples are the Basilica Porcia in Rome and one at Pompeii (late 2d cent. B.C.). Probably the most splendid Roman basilica is the one constructed during the reign of Maxentius and finished by Constantine after 313. In the 4th cent. Christians began to build edifices for worship that were related to the form of the basilicas. These had a center nave with one aisle at each side and an apse at one end: on this platform sat the bishop and priests. Basilicas of this type were built not only in Western Europe but in Greece, Syria, Egypt, and Palestine. A good example of the Middle Eastern basilica is the Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem (6th cent.). The finest basilicas in Rome were St. John Lateran and St. Paul's-outside-the-Walls (4th cent.), and San Clemente (6th cent.). Gradually there emerged the massive Romanesque churches, which still retained the fundamental plan of the basilica.

Basilica

A Roman hall of justice with a high central space lit by a clerestory with a timbered gable roof. It became the form of the early Christian church, with a semicircular apse at the end preceded by a vestibule and atrium.

Basilica

 

(Greek: Basiliká), last codification of Byzantine law, completed in A.D. 890 during the reign of Emperor Leo VI (the Wise), and consisting of 60 books.

The Basilica is based on Justinian’s code of laws. Nevertheless, certain of the code’s regulations that were outmoded or abolished were not included in the Basilica. Moreover, in the Basilica each legal institution is examined in only one place and not in various books, as was the case with Justinian’s code of laws. In drawing up the Basilica, the Procheiron was also utilized, and in the latest copies of the Basilica excerpts are cited from the works of Byzantine jurists of the 11th and 12th centuries. In its class orientation the Basilica reflected the process of peasant oppression. Serfdom was again legalized, and restrictions were removed on the enlargement of private landholdings.

REFERENCE

Basilicorum libri LX, vols. 1-6, edited by C. G. E. Heimbach; vol. 7, edited by E. G. Terrini and J. Mercati. Leipzig, 1833-97.

Z. M. CHERNILOVSKII

basilica

basilica: Typical plan. A, D, apse; B, B’, secondary apse; C, high altar; D, bishop’s throne; G, transept; H, nave; J, J’, aisles
1. A Roman hall of justice, typically with a high central space lit by a clerestory and lower aisles all around it, and with apses or exedrae for the seats of the judges.
2. The form of the early Christian church, a central high nave with clerestory, lower aisles along the sides only,

basilica

1. a Roman building, used for public administration, having a large rectangular central nave with an aisle on each side and an apse at the end
2. a rectangular early Christian or medieval church, usually having a nave with clerestories, two or four aisles, one or more vaulted apses, and a timber roof
3. a Roman Catholic church having special ceremonial rights
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient who experienced primary failure is being assessed for surgical suitability for a basilic vein transposition procedure (two previous AV access failures and a history of central stenosis), and the second patient is being assessed for a transposed basilic vein fistula, pending investigation of hypercoagulability (two previous AV access failures).
When portions of the subclavian and innominate veins and superior vena cava cannot be visualized, which as noted is a common situation with US, reliable evaluation can be performed with catheter venography, with a contrast injection into the antecubital vein or via basilic or brachial vein access, with catheterization of the subclavian vein, under fluoroscopic control.
The cephalic and basilic veins are also located in the forearm and upper arms; however, they may be more difficult to palpate due to their location deep within surrounding muscles and proximity to bone structures (Alexander & Corrigan, 2004).This specific knowledge of vein placement is only a portion of the advanced education and technical experience necessary for nurses to be adequately equipped.
Ultrasound is utilised in emergency department peripheral cannula insertion, usually via basilic vein puncture (Blaivas & Lyon, 2006).
At 6 weeks follow-up consultation, when the patient returned for the surfacing of the basilic vein he had permanent spontaneous pain in his fingers, muscular rigidity and 2 small necrotic lesions on the anterior aspect of the 2nd phalanx of the 5th finger and at its base on the posterior aspect of the hand (Figure 1).
Burton and Haddawy have the euphonic but slightly puzzling "basil of the bridges." Miquel gives us the more mysterious basilic du brave, evidently reading jasur (bold, daring,) instead of jusur (bridges) (1: 72).
The device is inserted in a peripheral vein in the arm such as the cephalic vein, basilic vein, or brachial vein.
Peter's Basilic which is typically sealed.AaAeAeA The tradition of opening the door to sign the start of a Holy Year (http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/07/world/pope-holy-doors/index.html?sr=twCNN120715http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/07/world/pope-holy-doors/index.html0652PMStoryLink&linkId=19385865) datesAaAeAeA backAaAeAeA to theAaAeAeA 1500s , and calls for faithful Catholics t through the doorway to receive indulgences for their sins.
Locals love: Brasserie 3eme Mi-temps at Rue Jules Rimet, by the stadium, has a great atmosphere, while Le Basilic at Rue de la Boulangerie, opposite the basilica, has a large terrace.
In some studies, radical treatments with interposition ofthe greater saphenous vein or the basilic vein for reconstruction of the brachial artery obtained very good and promising results [14, 36].
Reports in this patient population indicate that symptomatic ischemia developed at the following rates: 10% to 25% in brachiocephalic and basilic level; 4% to 6% at forearm level; and 1% to 2% at radiocephalic level of forearm [6].