basilic vein


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basilic vein

[bə′sil·ik ′vān]
(anatomy)
The large superficial vein of the arm on the medial side of the biceps brachii muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The surgical procedure was aimed at surfacing the basilic vein.
The cephalic and basilic veins are also located in the forearm and upper arms; however, they may be more difficult to palpate due to their location deep within surrounding muscles and proximity to bone structures (Alexander & Corrigan, 2004).
AV access creations as a result of the conversion project includes 13 radiocephalic fistulas, eight brachiocephalic fistulas, and four transposed basilic vein fistulas (Table 4).
Both one stage and two stage basilic vein transposition procedures have been reported with generally good results10-11.
Every patient has only four superficial upper extremity veins, the cephalic and the basilic vein in each arm.
During the course of hospitalization, he also developed mild steroid induced gastritis, suspected ventilator associated pneumonia (treated empirically with linezolid and piperacillin/tazobactam for 7 days), worsening elevation of liver enzymes secondary to propofol use, and right basilic vein thrombosis owing to presence of intervenous lines.
Initially, many anaesthetists used peripheral sites such as the antecubital median basilic vein, the external jugular or femoral vein for cannulation.
New fistula creation techniques were developed in the early 1990s, such as the middle-arm fistulas (MAFs) (Bonforte, Zerbi, & Surian, 2004), reverse flow fistulas, and basilic vein transpositions (Hosam et al.
Sample A was collected as the first specimen immediately after venipuncture of the median cubital or basilic vein of the left arm; sample B was collected directly after sample A; and sample C was collected as the first specimen after a second venipuncture of the median cubital or basilic vein of the right arm.
The PICCs were placed using sterile technique, in the cephalic or the basilic vein via the antecubital fossa.
She, with her snowy left arm held closely against her snowlike breast bore a burning and shining torch, raised somewhat beyond and above her golden head, held the slender stalk-like extremity by the sharp point, and offering adroitly her free arm, more shining white than was that of Pelops, in which appear the delicate veins of the upper arm and the basilic vein, such like those sandalwood lines drawn on the cleanest papyrus.