basilisk


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iguana

iguana (ĭgwäˈnə), name for several large lizards of the family Iguanidae, found in tropical America and the Galapagos. The common iguana (Iguana iguana) is a tree-living, strictly vegetarian species found along streams from Mexico to N South America. Members of this species are 3 to 6 ft (90–180 cm) long, with the tail accounting for two-thirds of the length. They are bright green with dark stripes on the tail. A crest of spines runs from the neck to the tail. The flesh and eggs of the common iguana are valued as food. Spiny, or black, iguanas (species of Ctenosaura) are ground-living vegetarian lizards found from Baja California to Central America. The chuckwalla (Sauromalus obesus) and the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) are desert species of the SW United States and NW Mexico. The 16-in. long (40-cm), greenish chuckwalla is the largest U.S. lizard except for the gila monster and is known for its ability to inflate itself, making it difficult to extract from crevices. The gray-brown desert iguana is marked with dark spots and stripes; it lives in burrows made by other animals. Both feed on cactus flowers and fruits and tender desert plants. Basilisks Basiliscus (species), found along streams in tropical America, are large iguanas that can walk in an upright position; males are crested. A marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), the only marine lizard, is found in the Galapagos Islands, where there is also a land species (Conolophus subcristatus). The large, diverse iguana family includes many smaller species not called iguanas. They are found throughout the temperate and tropical Americas, as well as in the Fiji Islands and on Madagascar. Most North American lizards belong to this family, including the collared lizards, the utas, the swifts, the so-called horned toads, or horned lizards, and the American chameleon, or anole (not a true chameleon). Most members of the family feed on insects and other small animals as well as some plant matter. In nearly all species the females lay eggs in the ground. Iguanas are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Reptilia, order Squamata, family Iguanidae.
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basilisk

monstrous reptile; has fatal breath and glance. [Gk. Folklore: Jobes, 184]

basilisk

lizard supposed to kill with its gaze. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 93]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

basilisk

1. (in classical legend) a serpent that could kill by its breath or glance
2. any small arboreal semiaquatic lizard of the genus Basiliscus of tropical America: family Iguanidae (iguanas). The males have an inflatable head crest, used in display
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Basilisk, fertilized with 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kg [ha.sup.-1] [year.sup.-1] of N and intercropped with eucalyptus, clone GG 100 (Eucalyptus grandis x E.urophylla).
The second novelty of Basilisk was the idea that learning multiple semantic classes simultaneously can help to constrain and steer the bootstrapping process.
Basilisk), which are resistant and susceptible standards to spittlebugs, respectively (Miles et al.
Sgt Potter, who also served in the Battle of Britain, took part in the rescue of 200 service personnel from HMS Basilisk when it was sunk by German aircraft during the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.
The Razer Basilisk brings a sensitivity clutch to the Razer lineup of gaming mice to give you an extra edge in FPS games.
For example, while it may be true, as Schulze proposes, that Moore's poems of the 1920s ask us to "go back to nature without heading through it in the name of upward comparisons," her poems of the 1930s frequently look upward, at "the great crab-flounder of Montana caught // and changed from that which creeps to that which is angelic" (A-Q 55); the plumet basilisk, "aquatic flying / lizard-fairy" (81); the frigate pelican "glid[ing] / a hundred feet or quiver[ing] about / as charred paper behaves" (84); and, most particularly for my purposes, at pigeons flying "eight hundred sixty-eight miles / in four days and six hours" (102).
How was I to know what was rupture from the good yarn the basilisk still with her poison in the tumbling after-days.
The Visit Coventry Facebook post said: "Basilisk fang found in big hole outside front of old Cov Telegraph building.
Those who know what the only antidote to Basilisk venom is, or the symbol for Gryffindor house, have a good chance of winning.
Browne debunked these and many other myths, but he also believed flying horses and the basilisk might be real; that some elephants have "written whole sentences"; that we all have guardian angels; and that the Devil tempts us (98).