basin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

basin

1. any partially enclosed or sheltered area where vessels may be moored or docked
2. the catchment area of a particular river and its tributaries or of a lake or sea
3. a depression in the earth's surface
4. Geology a part of the earth's surface consisting of rock strata that slope down to a common centre

basin

A huge crater. Lunar basins are multiringed structures that are several hundred kilometers in diameter and were all produced during the first 750 million years of lunar history by intense meteoritic impact. The youngest basins (Orientale, Imbrium, Crisium, Nectaris, and Serenitatis) may have been excavated during a cataclysmic period around 3900 million years ago. The ejecta blankets of basins are extensive and provide the basis for highland stratigraphy. Basins are so defined by their systems of concentric ring structures, most of which are now in the form of ridges and mountain arcs. Basins on the Moon's nearside were filled with lava at some time up to 3000 million years ago to produce maria: the resulting mare has the same name as the basin (e.g. Mare Imbrium). Several unfilled basins (thassaloids) exist on the farside, the largest of which was revealed as a vast depression by the Apollo 15 laser altimeter. At least 28 basins are now known to exist. See also rille; mascons.

Basin

 

the accumulation of water flows with no drainage or with slow drainage in natural or artificial depressions in the earth’s surface. Basins are formed when there are en-closed hollows on the surface and when the water flowing into them exceeds the water lost by evaporation and seepage into the soil. Basins can be permanent or temporary, arising only during periods of the year which abound in water. Basins are classified as freshwater or saltwater, depending upon their chemical composition and the amount of salts dissolved in the water. The physical, chemical, and bio-logical processes in basins progress in various ways, depending upon the type of basin. Reservoirs, ponds, and canals are artificial basins.


Basin

 

negative (hollow) form of relief of the earth’s surface with more or less isometric or slightly elongated outlines. A basin may be closed on all sides or open in one or two directions. On the basis of morphology flat-bottom, bowl-shaped, and other basins are distinguished; by origin basins are divided into tectonic, volcanic (for example, calderas), erosion, glacial (for example, moraine-dammed basins), deflation, and karst. By drainage conditions they are divided into basins through which water flows, basins with outlets, and basins without outlets (in arid regions).

In the geomorphology of the sea floor a distinction is made between basins in the transition zone, which are occupied by geosynclinal seas, and oceanic basins, which are the largest negative forms of relief on the ocean floor.

basin

[′bās·ən]
(civil engineering)
A dock employing floodgates to keep water level constant during tidal variations.
A harbor for small craft.
(design engineering)
An open-top vessel with relatively low sloping sides for holding liquids.
(geology)
A low-lying area, wholly or largely surrounded by higher land, that varies from a small, nearly enclosed valley to an extensive, mountain-rimmed depression.
An entire area drained by a given stream and its tributaries.
An area in which the rock strata are inclined downward from all sides toward the center.
An area in which sediments accumulate.
(metallurgy)
The mouth of a sprue in a gating system of castings into which the molten metal is first poured.
(oceanography)
Deep portion of sea surrounded by shallower regions.

basin

1. A somewhat shallow vessel for holding water (or the like).
2. A shallow tank or natural or artificial depression containing water.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 5th-order basin can be the direct recipient of 3rd and 2nd-order tributaries, as well as skipping 4th-order ones.
Management of water is needed because users of water in the Antelope Valley are taking out basin water at a faster rate than it can be recharged, Pfaeffle said.
A hasty sketch of the Basin in the twentieth century constitutes Gardner's conclusion.
Neil Pettigrew, a project geologist with Avalon Ventures, says Middleton has developed "a model for the Nipigon basin that could host a Noril sk type deposit.
News photos and video coverage have captured some of the wretched conditions of the basin, with scenes reminiscent of the Oklahoma "Dust Bowl": baked, cracked soil; dead crops, shrubs, and trees; blowing dust.
Federal land makes up 26 percent of the Puget Sound basin, most of what's left of the old-growth protected after the fierce battles that swirled around protection of the northern spotted owl.
Even if current speculation about Argyle Planitia does hold water, Parker says, it's unclear whether the basin contained a windy lake or a still, ice-covered reservoir.
The Russians have recently passed laws to begin the privatization of home ownership and the construction industry, Minister Basin said.
This includes an estimated $860 million for Basin's 385 mw ownership interest in the Dry Fork coal-based unit scheduled for completion in 2011, another base load facility that Basin is developing for completion by 2015, and $300 million for environmental control technology for one of Basin's existing coal-based facilities.
During the stress testing conducted in 2004, treatment deficiencies (high settled turbidity and poorly coagulated water) were identified in this basin pair.
City officials said they had discussed with county officials a cooperative agreement for building the Hunt Canyon basin, but the county lacks the money.
This displaces water in the ocean basin and pushes the sea up onto the land.