batch treatment

batch treatment

[′bach ‚trēt·mənt]
(chemical engineering)
A corrosion control procedure in which chemical corrosion inhibitors are injected into the lines of a production system.
(petroleum engineering)
A process for separating an emulsion of crude oil and water into its components.
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Approximately 15 grams of almonds were placed in a single layer in the discharge chamber for each batch treatment. The scientists applied 20 kV to 30 kV of power to the electrodes.
The Safeway Pig Loader is a safe way to introduce a pig into any pipeline that requires cleaning, unclogging, or preparation for batch treatment processes, hydrostatic testing, or other types of structural integrity testing.
As reported by Crane et al., [22] it is likely that chemical reduction of aqueous [U.sup.6+] to solid [U.sup.4+] (as U[O.sub.2]) occurred for all batch treatment systems during the initial stage of U sorption onto the nano-[Fe.sup.0].
In this way, the process operates on a batch treatment principle, with the operations being sequenced within 3 to 4 hours.
Graphyte Batch, a process control system for production of CGI using batch treatment.
For each batch treatment, 15 grams of almonds were placed in a single layer in the discharge chamber.
"Batch treatment kills the bacteria before they have time to multiply, release toxins and cause permanent lung damage that depresses performance."
Figure 1 shows the impact of the parameters on the laccase-catalyzed elimination of BPA as a function of pH and temperature after a 4-hour batch treatment. Figure 2 is a 3-D representation of this information.
HIV second batch treatment starts: "The second batch of President Dr.
"Where today, batch treatment requires a series of steps with transportation of the batch to different locations."
The key reason that bleach plants rely on several stages is that no single chemical can presently remove all the residual lignin while preserving the strength of the cellulose in the pulp in a single batch treatment within reasonable time.
This finally brought about predictable, "demand-based" chlorination of stored water, more efficient use of city manpower, and elimination of persistent taste and odor complaints that had followed the city's earlier batch treatment operations.