Batten

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Related to batten down the hatches: heads up, be in touch, at the expense of, Batten disease

batten

1. a narrow flat length of wood or plastic inserted in pockets of a sail to give it proper shape
2. a lath used for holding a tarpaulin along the side of a raised hatch on a ship
3. Theatre
a. a row of lights
b. the strip or bar supporting them
4. NZ an upright part of a fence made of wood or other material, designed to keep wires at equal distances apart

Batten

Jean. 1909--82, New Zealand aviator: the first woman to fly single-handed from Australia to Britain (1935)

Batten

A narrow strip of wood that is applied over a joint between parallel boards in the same plane. In roofing, the standing seam of a metal roof gives the same appearance of a batten,

Batten

 

(Russian tes), a thin board obtained by sawing softwood logs lengthwise. Battens are 4–6.4 m long, 19–25 mm thick, and usually 100–110 mm wide. They are used in shipbuilding and railroad car construction to form paneling—either flush or with spaces between the planks—and to cover roofs and panel walls. Originally, boards obtained from the roughhewing of logs (obtesyvanie), which were usually first split in half, were designated by the term tes.

batten

[′bat·ən]
(aerospace engineering)
Metal, wood, or plastic panels laced to the envelope of a blimp in the nose cone to add rigidity to the nose and provide a good point of attachment for mooring.
(building construction)
A sawed timber strip of specific dimension-usually 7 inches (18 centimeters) broad, less than 4 inches (10 centimeters) thick, and more than 6 feet (1.8 meters) long-used for outside walls of houses, flooring, and such.
A strip of wood nailed across a door or other structure made of parallel boards to strengthen it and prevent warping.

batten

1. A narrow strip of wood applied to cover a joint along the edges of two parallel boards in the same plane.
2. A strip of wood fastened across two or more parallel boards to hold them together; also called a cross batten
3. A flat strip of wood attached to a wall as a base for lathing, plastering, etc.; also called a furring strip.
4. In roofing, a wood strip applied over boards or roof structural members; used as a base for the attachment of slate, wood, or clay-tile shingles.
5.See board and batten
6. A board usually 2 in. (5 cm) to 4 in. (10 cm) thick and usually used as a lathing support or in flooring.
7. A steel strip used to secure metal flooring on a fire escape.
8. On a theater stage, a strip of wood to frame, stiffen, or reinforce a flat, or to fasten several flats together.
9. On a theater stage, length of hollow metal of round, square, or rectangular cross section used in connection with stage rigging to hang scenery or lighting equipment, such as a pipe batten or lighting batten.
References in periodicals archive ?
IT'S a case of batten down the hatches as Birmingham braces itself for another miserable weekend of torrential rain.
The Met Office said: "It's time for householders to batten down the hatches. Tomorrow will be windy, but the strongest winds will come tomorrow night.
A flight attendant came on the intercom to breathlessly tell us to batten down the hatches and that the toilets were now out of bounds, even though everyone suddenly needed them.
But he warned that everyone at the club had to pull the same way as he decided to 'batten down the hatches'.
BRITAIN was told to batten down the hatches yesterday as it faced the backlash of America's Hurricane Floyd.
SCOTS have been warned to batten down the hatches tomorrow when severe gales are set to batter the country.
Although you would not cross the road to watch some of his teams batten down the hatches, Pulis (above) has put out more fires than Red Adair.
Those of us who escaped the weather will today go to the football, rugby, racing or the sales - or batten down the hatches for another day at home with family and friends.
He urged everyone to "batten down the hatches" and delay journeys by up to three hours this morning.
Batten down the hatches! The Mighty Stef take to the road this weekend for a few dates.
IT'S time to batten down the hatches as storms, heavy flooding and even snow could be coming.
HOUSEHOLDERS were today urged to batten down the hatches as 140kph gusts and high seas are expected to batter the coast.