Batter

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batter

[′bad·ər]
(civil engineering)
A uniformly steep slope in a retaining wall or pier; inclination is expressed as 1 foot horizontally per vertical unit (in feet).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Batter

A wall that gently slopes inward toward the top.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

batter

To incline from the vertical. A wall is said to batter when it recedes as it rises.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
More effectively still, batterers threaten to kill those whom the victim cares about, from family members to the family dog.
The Catholic Charities batterer intervention program is getting similar results.
The risk of violence increases by 500% when batterers have access to firearms.
Second, the increased presence of domestic violence cases in the courtroom gave batterers the opportunity to use the legal system as an additional avenue to harass their victims.
Comparison between the two groups showed statistically significant differences; imprisoned batterers showed a higher rate of distorted ideas about the inferiority of women and the use of violence as a correct way to cope with interpersonal problems.
(73) In addition, prior studies have not yet determined which batterers are more or less likely to complete batterer treatment.
(57) While each state has created their own construct of what constitutes domestic violence, every state that has adopted a rebuttable presumption against awarding custody to batterers limits the definition of domestic violence to acts of physical or sexual abuse.
Typically, when referred to BIPs batterers resist treatment (Buttell & Pike, 2003; Chang & Saunders, 2002; Eckhardt, Holtzworth-Munroe, Norlander, Sibley, & Cahill, 2008).
The most widely adopted theory of batterers and batterer intervention services, the Duluth model, was developed with only male perpetrators in mind (Pence & Paymar, 1986,1993).
The breakdown of batterers identity following police intervention.
Batterers can change, and we need to care for and support
The first batterer intervention program, or BIP, was founded in Boston in 1977 by men who wanted to combat the misogynistic attitudes they viewed as the root of abusive behavior.