Batter

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batter

[′bad·ər]
(civil engineering)
A uniformly steep slope in a retaining wall or pier; inclination is expressed as 1 foot horizontally per vertical unit (in feet).

Batter

A wall that gently slopes inward toward the top.

batter

To incline from the vertical. A wall is said to batter when it recedes as it rises.
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually batterers do not use a torrent of uncontrolled violence, but rather violence that is purposeful and sporadic.
The Catholic Charities batterer intervention program is getting similar results.
Second, the increased presence of domestic violence cases in the courtroom gave batterers the opportunity to use the legal system as an additional avenue to harass their victims.
The subjects form part of a research programme about the effectiveness of psychological intervention with batterers.
A Batterers Intervention Program (BIP), whose purpose it is to further the safety of the victim and the children as well as to hold perpetrators accountable, (49) was ordered by the court in 25.
Typically, when referred to BIPs batterers resist treatment (Buttell & Pike, 2003; Chang & Saunders, 2002; Eckhardt, Holtzworth-Munroe, Norlander, Sibley, & Cahill, 2008).
As we have seen, batterers tend to be ultra controlling of the abused parent when it comes to decision-making related to child rearing.
The present findings suggest that there are few standards available to meet the growing need for services for female batterers.
survivor, and emphasizing that violence is a choice and the batterer is
The Newsweek article, for instance, asserts that "according to one 2004 survey in Massachusetts by Harvard's Jay Silverman, 54 percent of custody cases involving documented spousal abuse were decided in favor of the alleged batterers.
For 15 years she has been on the front lines of the battle against domestic violence, counseling both batterers and victims, fighting to find funding for programs that lock up abusers and keep victims safe, and growing increasingly frustrated with a legal system ill-equipped to handle the problem's complexity.
The study reported in this article investigated the pretreatment level of moral reasoning of 92 African American and white batterers beginning court-mandated treatment and whether the current standardized treatment program was effective in altering the level of moral reasoning of these batterers.