battery of genes

battery of genes

[′bad·ə·rē əv ′jēnz]
(genetics)
The set of producer genes which is activated when a particular sensor gene activates its set of integrator genes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been shown that abnormal expression of PPAR[gamma] in fibroblasts induces the expression of a battery of genes including adipokines, leptin, resistin and the accumulation of triglyceride droplets (Tontonoz and Spiegelman, 2008).
Actually, global transcriptome analysis of postmortem AD brains by microarray has identified a battery of genes aberrantly regulated in AD, whose role has not been previously predicted in its pathogenesis [8].
Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies now report discovering that ES cells cycle in and out of a "magical state" in the early stages of embryo development, during which a battery of genes essential for cell potency (the ability of a generic cell to differentiate, or develop, into a cell with specialized functions) is activated.
The research identifies for the first time that DUO1 switches on a battery of genes that together govern sperm cell production and their ability to produce seeds.
The discovery of a battery of genes governed by DUO1 has shed light on the mechanisms by which plants control sperm cell formation and fertility.
The final phase of the uterotrophic response coincides with the induction of a battery of genes involved in the cytoarchitectural remodeling of proliferating uterine cells, thus providing a further link between phenotypic and gene expression changes (Figure 7A).
In conclusion, calibrated RT-PCR is a reliable and accurate method for evaluating the expression of AHR and a related battery of genes that have been proposed as mediators of the majority of biochemical and toxicologic effects of several xenobiotics.
Parallel to these fundamental revelations were the observations that all organisms are equipped with a battery of genes that produce proteins whose primary roles are to prevent or repair chemical and physical damage to DNA; such activities protect against mutation and cell death induced by DNA-damaging agents, and studies of these activities eventually evolved into the field of genetic toxicology.