bavenite

bavenite

[bə′vē‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
References in periodicals archive ?
Kopruden alinan ozgun tugla numuneleri uzerinde yapilan minerolojik ve mikrokimyasal analizler (XRF-XRD) neticesinde ozgun tugla numunesinin Bavenite [Ca.sub.4] [Be.sub.2.5] [Al.sub.1.5] [Si.sub.9] [O.sub.25.5] [(OH).sub.2.5] ve Magnezyum Kalsit ([Mg.sub.0.06] [Ca.sub.0.94]) (C[O.sub.3]) yapisinda ve mineral oranlarinin da asagidaki deser aralisinda oldugu tespit edilmistir.
The typically Alpine associations include crystals of quartz, white tabular calcite, apatite-(CaF) and bavenite (Stroh, 1985; Niedermayr, 1986,2002).
The Londonderry feldspar pegmatite has been a well known source for gem petalite, excellent ixiolite and columbite crystals, and the rare minerals eucryptite, bavenite, bityite and moraesite.
Daniele Respino and Sandro Maggia (www.minernet.it) had a choice selection of uncommon minerals: bavenite crystals from Cadalso de los Vidrios, Spain, blue henmilite crystals from the Fuka mine, Bicchu-cho, Japan, some good specimens of the uncommon arsenate vladimirite from Irtem, Morocco and various other minerals from worldwide occurrences.
Of special interest to the geo-literati and the more advanced collectors is an excellent review of the early literature on Baveno, from the seminal work by Ermenegildo Pini, Memoire sur des nouvelles crystallizations de feldspath (1779), to Rome de l'Isle Cristallographie (1783), Gauthier D'Agoty's Histoire Naturelle (1781) and Hauy's Mineralogie (1801), and continuing with Quintino Sella, Giovanni Struver, Ettore Artini (who discovered two new species from Baveno: bazzite and bavenite) and a few more recent authors.
In the Ermakovskoye deposit in the Ural Mountains, split prismatic crystals of milarite to 4 cm long occur with bavenite (Pekov, 1994).
In the Bayerischer Wald (in Bavaria, the former West Germany), the Himmelleitenbruch diorite quarry near Rossbach ceased operations in 1984, but examination of altered pegmatitic material once collected in its lowermost levels revealed colorless, water-clear, long-prismatic milarite crystals to 0.5 mm embedded in 1.5-cm aggregates of fibrous bavenite crystals (Bode and Wittern, 1989; Sperling and Zahnleiter, 1992).
Vinals, personal communication), schorl, axinite, apatite, bavenite (rare) etc.
Along with gem spodumene and tourmaline, Jahns and Wright (1951) list quartz, perthitic microdine, albite, beryl (morganite and aquamarine), bavenite, bertrandite, numerous bismuth-containing minerals including native bismuth, bismuthialte, bismutite, and bismite, and nurnerous phosphates including lithiophilite, triphylite, sickletite, purpurite, heterosite, stewartite, and hureaulite.
Included were laumontite crystals to 4 cm, in clusters lacking matrix, large plates of botryoidal prehnite from the Castilla quarry, and up to 1-cm tufts of bavenite on feldspar crystals from the Los Gallegos quarry.
Nice micromounts of milarite, bavenite and manganite have also turned up.
Other material included massive bavenite (to several cm!) with epidote from Kalisay, Kyrgzien; milarite from Ermakovskoe, Buryatien; and sharp nepheline crystals (to 1 cm) frozen in matrix with well-formed eudialyte crystals and aegirine from Alluaiv, Lovozero massif, Kola Peninsula.