Ribaldry

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Ribaldry

Ridicule (See MOCKERY.)
Decameron, The
Boccaccio’s bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314–315, 380]
Droll Tales
Balzac’s Rabelaisian stories, told in racy medieval style and frequently gross. [Fr. Lit.: Contes Drolatiques in Benét, 222]
Fescennia
Etrurian town noted for jesting and scurrilous verse (Fescennine verse). [Rom. Hist.: EB, TV: 112]
Gargantua and Pantagruel
Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
Golden Ass, The
tale of Lucius and his asininity, with a number of bawdy episodes. [Rom. Lit.: Apuleius Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass in Magill I, 309]
Goliards
scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292–293]
Iambe
girl who amused Demeter with bawdy stories. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
LaFontaine, The Tales of
ribald stories in verse, adapted from Boccaccio and others. [Fr. Lit.: Contes en Vers in Benét, 222]
Miller’s Tale, The
lusty story told by the drunken Miller. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Magill II, 131]
Reeve’s Tale, The
Oswald the Reeve retaliates in kind to The Miller’s Tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Benét, 919]
References in periodicals archive ?
We like to say that we have sex; the image says that sex has us." (37) The bawdiness of the planet resides not just in its power to incite people to lechery, but in its own lechery, the pleasure it takes from striking bodies to the "east, west, north, and south." (38)
This is particularly evident with Hamlet's verbal bawdiness with Ophelia: "That's a fair thought, to lie between a maid's legs"(III.ii.107).
Host Chelsea Handler gave the show its traditional bawdiness, though her jokes often fell flat.
The revealing dance style was popular in the music halls of Victorian Britain where its overt sexiness and bawdiness was in sharp contrast to the strict moral values of the time.
Focusing on performances in Sydney and Melbourne, the essay illustrates the appeal of the song, of how it resembled other performances in cheap places of amusement, and how, for unruly young blue-collar women in particular, 'Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay' smacked of a feminine bawdiness which recalled the libertinism of early- to mid-nineteenth-century entertainments.
She said she was "wary" of Mr Wright before the events of October 12, and when she first joined Merseytravel had been warned about "Phil the Perv's" apparent reputation for bawdiness.
Thankfully, just as you found yourself welling up, a bit of bawdiness would relieve the tension, such as when letters from bereaved women flutter down from above and poignant snippets are read out - along with a suggestive letter from a prisoner.
(51) Indeed, as with Bysshe's Art of English Poetry, the compiler's attention is turned to the "best" pieces rather than the most moralistic; and so some bawdiness creeps in, including the whole of the pissing contest from the Dunciad and a great deal of brutal combat from Homer.
"The production seems to have gone down really well with Northern audiences - I think they appreciate the bawdiness of the humour - so we're hoping for a good end to the run at the Civic."
For instance, Alison Glenzer's Mistress Overdone lived up to her name, punching up the bawdiness until it was indeed overdone, and Sarah "Fallon's Isabella was one dimensional, only revolted by Angelo's sexuality.
The film and the character lay their sexual cards on the table in a dizzying montage of carnal permutations practiced by Bruno and his diminutive Asian boytoy, setting the tone for subsequent bawdiness that pushes the proverbial envelope while suggesting plenty got left in the Avid delete queue.
The great progressive literary critic, Vissarion Belinskii (1811-1848), asked the writer Nikolai Gogol (1809-1852) in 1847, "Is not the Russian priest regarded by everyone as a symbol of gluttony, avarice, sycophancy, bawdiness?" (14).