Ribaldry

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Ribaldry

Ridicule (See MOCKERY.)
Decameron, The
Boccaccio’s bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314–315, 380]
Droll Tales
Balzac’s Rabelaisian stories, told in racy medieval style and frequently gross. [Fr. Lit.: Contes Drolatiques in Benét, 222]
Fescennia
Etrurian town noted for jesting and scurrilous verse (Fescennine verse). [Rom. Hist.: EB, TV: 112]
Gargantua and Pantagruel
Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
Golden Ass, The
tale of Lucius and his asininity, with a number of bawdy episodes. [Rom. Lit.: Apuleius Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass in Magill I, 309]
Goliards
scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292–293]
Iambe
girl who amused Demeter with bawdy stories. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
LaFontaine, The Tales of
ribald stories in verse, adapted from Boccaccio and others. [Fr. Lit.: Contes en Vers in Benét, 222]
Miller’s Tale, The
lusty story told by the drunken Miller. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Magill II, 131]
Reeve’s Tale, The
Oswald the Reeve retaliates in kind to The Miller’s Tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Benét, 919]
References in periodicals archive ?
Richly and complexly allusive, masterful in tone and technique, 'A Small Ode' serves as a test case for Baxter's poetics of bawdry and conducts a deep and subtle dialogue with the work of a poet who preoccupied Baxter throughout his career and not just throughout his tenure of the Fellowship that bears his name.
At other times the detonator could be an obscene word or a sexual image, which is why Baxter places such a premium on Robert Burns's bawdry and why he believes that the 'greatest latitude should be allowed a poet in the use of coarse language and sexual imagery'.
38) Believed to cite both Shakespeare's play and Chapman's Memorable Masque at Middle Temple and Lincoln Hall (1613), which delighted crowds with the performances of "a dozen little boys" dressed as baboons dressed as humans, Greene's "baboon" purportedly delighted the crowd in 1615 with an even ruder, rawer, and perhaps muddier rendition of baboon bawdry.
He has the prettiest love-songs for maids, so without bawdry, which is strange, with such delicate burdens of dildos and fadings, "jump her and thump her.
Although dated to about 1680, this ballad continues an old tradition of bawdry.
69-89) and the extramarital, but offstage, relations of Flirt and Parson Dunce, constitutes the entirety of Behn's peripheral, and quite tame, exploration of colonial bawdry.
Burford and Joy Wotton, Private Vices--Public Virtues: Bawdry in London from Elizabethan Times to the Regence (London: Robert Hale, 1995), 23.
Also, whereas bawdry disrupted the usual household order, women gained some of their sway by purposely inverting this order.