Ribaldry

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Ribaldry

Ridicule (See MOCKERY.)
Decameron, The
Boccaccio’s bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314–315, 380]
Droll Tales
Balzac’s Rabelaisian stories, told in racy medieval style and frequently gross. [Fr. Lit.: Contes Drolatiques in Benét, 222]
Fescennia
Etrurian town noted for jesting and scurrilous verse (Fescennine verse). [Rom. Hist.: EB, TV: 112]
Gargantua and Pantagruel
Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
Golden Ass, The
tale of Lucius and his asininity, with a number of bawdy episodes. [Rom. Lit.: Apuleius Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass in Magill I, 309]
Goliards
scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292–293]
Iambe
girl who amused Demeter with bawdy stories. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
LaFontaine, The Tales of
ribald stories in verse, adapted from Boccaccio and others. [Fr. Lit.: Contes en Vers in Benét, 222]
Miller’s Tale, The
lusty story told by the drunken Miller. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Magill II, 131]
Reeve’s Tale, The
Oswald the Reeve retaliates in kind to The Miller’s Tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Benét, 919]
References in periodicals archive ?
"As a Mason, a member of the bawdy club the Crochallan Fencibles - for which Burns collected the very bawdy poems of The Merry Muses of Caledonia - and as a celebrant of fraternity, Burns had quite a taste for this.
Instead of emphasizing a particular body part or sexual act, however, I will consider how certain uses of the word bawdy function through a kind of corporeal imprecision, or, to borrow a term from Jean Feerick and Vin Nardizzi, an "indistinction" of the human body.
It will bring under the spotlight, he says, the "bawdy doings" of the Delaval family in the north and in London.
Nevertheless, this sampling of male defendants is significant enough to show that men must not have escaped completely in the societies' war on bawdy houses.
Its impressive, often striking visual design and broad, bawdy humour could best be described as an offbeat combination of Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam and Wayne and Shuster.
At the same time, she examines the varied, potentially bawdy readings of Shakespeare's familiar name Will, which recurs prominently in the later sonnets.
Apparently America's gag reflex has finally kicked in, and shoppers complained to the retail chain about its soft-porn fare, causing it to drop the bawdy mags.
During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Southwark was London's bawdy pleasure district; more recently, its cheap warehouse spaces attracted colonies of artists and craftspeople.
Shame on you, Senators and Congressmen, who have turned this headquarters of a great and self-governing people into a bawdy house." She went on to advocate the passage of "election reforms and anticorruption measures" to insure that the government is no longer "by and for the wealthy elite."
American writer best known for novels that combine philosophical depth with biting satire and boisterous, often bawdy humor.
Delaney writes with wit and bawdy humor about the English working class, into which she was born.
(2009/12) Carry on Girls 11.40pm, ITV Bawdy comedy about a local councillor who persuades the Mayor to hold a beauty pageant to improve the image of their dilapidated town.