beacon


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Beacon,

city (1990 pop. 13,243), Dutchess co., SE N.Y., on the E bank of the Hudson River; settled 1663, inc. in 1913 when Fishkill Landing and Matteawan villages were united. Beacon's textile, printing, and other industries have declined, but the opening of Dia:Beacon, the world's largest museum of contemporary art, has stimulated a revival of the city. The Newburgh-Beacon Bridge connects the city with Newburgh on the west bank. An incline railway ascends Mt. Beacon, site of a monument to Revolutionary soldiers who built signal fires to warn of the coming of the British.

beacon

[′bē·kən]
(navigation)
A light, group of lights, electronic apparatus, or other device which emits identifying signals related to their positions so that the information so produced can be used by the navigator or pilots of aircraft and ships for guidance orientation or warning.
A structure where such a device is mounted or located.

beacon

1. a hill on which such fires were lit
2. a lighthouse, signalling buoy, etc., used to warn or guide ships in dangerous waters
3. a radio or other signal marking a flight course in air navigation
4. short for Belisha beacon
5. a stone set by a surveyor to mark a corner or line of a site boundary, etc.
References in classic literature ?
The beacon bathed with light the little strait through which they were about to pass and the rock where the young man stood with bare head and crossed arms.
When first pronounced by your rubicund lips, it thrilled on my amazed senses like a beacon of light--"
I assume he followed the land and passed through what is at present known as Margate Roads, groping his careful way along the hidden sandbanks, whose every tail and spit has its beacon or buoy nowadays.
As far as a man can see when he looks out upon the sea from some high beacon, so far can the loud-neighing horses of the gods spring at a single bound.
They were hailed by the travellers with that joy with which a beacon on a seashore is hailed by mariners after a long and dangerous voyage.
However, for the fourth time Windy Corner lay poised below him-- now as a beacon in the roaring tides of darkness.
But when he won two more holes, bringing the score to like-as-we-lie, it flamed up within him like a beacon.
They walked back toward Beacon Street, and near the club Archer caught sight of the plush-lined "herdic" which had carried his note to the Parker House, and whose driver was reposing from this effort by bathing his brow at the corner hydrant.
Without doubt, this strange beacon light would awaken far away, the woodcutter of the hills of Bicêtre, terrified to behold the gigantic shadow of the towers of Notre-Dame quivering over his heaths.
I have no right to ask your help, and I dare not allow myself to indulge in any hopes; but once you said just one word, and that word lighted up the night of my life, and became the beacon of my days.
Several of these guns, and especially that at Giffords and the one on Beacon Hill above Matawan, were remarkably well handled.
How shall we make the mansion on yon Beacon Street feel and see the need of the spirits in the lowliest cabin in Alabama cotton-fields or Louisiana sugar-bottoms?