beacon

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Beacon,

city (1990 pop. 13,243), Dutchess co., SE N.Y., on the E bank of the Hudson River; settled 1663, inc. in 1913 when Fishkill Landing and Matteawan villages were united. Beacon's textile, printing, and other industries have declined, but the opening of Dia:Beacon, the world's largest museum of contemporary art, has stimulated a revival of the city. The Newburgh-Beacon Bridge connects the city with Newburgh on the west bank. An incline railway ascends Mt. Beacon, site of a monument to Revolutionary soldiers who built signal fires to warn of the coming of the British.
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beacon

[′bē·kən]
(navigation)
A light, group of lights, electronic apparatus, or other device which emits identifying signals related to their positions so that the information so produced can be used by the navigator or pilots of aircraft and ships for guidance orientation or warning.
A structure where such a device is mounted or located.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

beacon

1. a hill on which such fires were lit
2. a lighthouse, signalling buoy, etc., used to warn or guide ships in dangerous waters
3. a radio or other signal marking a flight course in air navigation
4. short for Belisha beacon
5. a stone set by a surveyor to mark a corner or line of a site boundary, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

beacon

(1) See beaconing and Web bug.

(2) A device that transmits a continuous signal, typically via Bluetooth. See proximity beacon.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Beacons enable stores to promote multiple campaigns simultaneously to drive different business goals.
Hundreds of beacons are being lit throughout the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man and the UK's overseas territories to mark the occasion.
The Mirfield event has applied to become part of the official Queen's 90th Birthday Beacons, run by pageant master Bruno Peek.
Localization Experiments by a Mobile Beacon. In this section, according to preliminary experiments by beacons randomly deployed, the advantage of path planning algorithm based on a mobile beacon is illustrated.
Statler said beacons aren't smart connected devices.
More than 200 gas fuelled beacons were lit across the country with Cliffe Park, Seaburn and Tynemouth Priory representing the North East.
Beacons will continue to power in-store engagement, according to another report, by Forrester Research.
Well, beacons are small and discreet--the size of a pebble.
The ELP-362D90 is a direct replacement for the existing beacons in the field, including the ELP-362D, DK100 and DK120 underwater beacons, and it claims a seven-year battery life.
has acquired US-based Bluetooth beacon cloud campaign management platform Proximity5, the company said on Thursday.
iBeacons (Apple certified beacons) or beacons are small computer devices that are placed inconspicuously within the franchise business location.
Jim Peters, chief technology officer, and the head of Sita Lab, said: "The relatively low cost of beacons makes them an attractive option for airports, but we need to be careful of adopting a gold rush approach to deploying them.