beak

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beak

1. the projecting jaws of a bird, covered with a horny sheath; bill
2. any beaklike mouthpart in other animals, such as turtles
3. Architect the upper surface of a cornice, which slopes out to throw off water
4. Chem the part of a still or retort through which vapour passes to the condenser
5. Nautical another word for ram

beak

[bēk]
(botany)
Any pointed projection, as on some fruits, that resembles a bird bill.
(invertebrate zoology)
The tip of the umbo in bivalves.
(vertebrate zoology)
The bill of a bird or some other animal, such as the turtle.
A projecting jawbone element of certain fishes, such as the sawfish and pike.
References in periodicals archive ?
We used factorial design (2 x 3), with two rearing systems (floor or cages) and three methods of beak trimming (hot-blade, infrared and undercutting, the latter serving as the control treatment).
"Infrared lasers have recently been designed with the purpose of providing a less painful, more precise beak-trimming method compared with conventional beak trimming."
According to Hester, "Beak trimming is accomplished by a precision automated cam-activated beak trimmer with a heated blade (1200[degrees]F)....
Regular beak trimming should not be necessary, so I prefer to do any beak work, especially if it is corrective.
The first study examined the comparative feeding behaviors of laying hens with or without beak trimming and revealed intriguing results.
While the British Egg Industry Council will lead an industry group to produce a Code of Practice for beak trimming.
He lifted a ban on routine beak trimming which he said could inadvertently have led to worse welfare for hens.
Beak trimming in laying hens is the removal of about 1/3-1/2 of the upper and lower beak of the young chicken, commonly using a hot-blade which simultaneously amputates and cauterizes.
It allows mechanisation in brooding and hatching, and beak trimming.
Animal welfare issues related to poultry housing and routine practices such as beak trimming and induced molting are spurring research such as this, to ensure both humane treatment of the animals and a healthy bottom line for producers.
ABSTRACT : For many years beak trimming has been a controversial subject, particularly since the 1980's when the practice came under close scrutiny by animal welfare groups.