beam efficiency

beam efficiency

See antenna.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

beam efficiency

[′bēm i‚fish·ən·sē]
(electromagnetism)
The fraction of the total radiated energy from an antenna contained in a single beam.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Algorithms and charts for beam efficiency, coherent and noncoherent scattering, the applications of microwave graphs and radar sensing devotes to forestry, snow and other projects necessitating measurement and analysis, and discussions that blend these formulas with concrete objectives makes for a solid and detailed reference engineers will find specific and useful.
The main beam efficiency (main beam is defined as 2.5 times 3dB beamwidth) is calculated to be around 75.0%, which is a typical value for a front-feed Cassegrain antenna.
In the future work, efforts are being taken to reduce spillover and increase main beam efficiency.
Aerial View also provides detailed numerical analysis of directivity, beam width, beam efficiency, vertical tilt, horizontal rotation, and more.
The beam efficiency is the ratio of the main-beam solid angle [[Omega].sub.M] to the (total) beam solid angle [[Omega].sub.A] expressed as
Beam efficiency usually lies in the range from 5 to 40 percent.
If operated at the same potential as the body of the TWT, the thermal dissipation in the collector would be extremely high, and the overall efficiency of the TWT (where the overall efficiency is defined as the Rf output power divided by the DC input power) would be very low, essentially the same as the beam efficiency. The RF interaction removes only a fraction of the kinetic energy from the electrons, and most of the remaining energy can be recovered by decelerating the electrons prior to collecting them.