beam width


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Related to beam width: directivity, Band width

beam width

[′bēm ‚width]
(electromagnetism)
The angle, measured in a horizontal plane, between the directions at which the intensity of an electromagnetic beam, such as a radar or radio beam, is one-half its maximum value. Also known as beam angle.

beam width

beam widthclick for a larger image
The beam width of an antenna is the angle in degrees between the half-power points in the azimuth plane.
The full angular interval in the horizontal plane between the points at which the power radiated from the antenna has fallen to half its maximum value. In practice, the effective beam width may be less than this value and may be altered by use of gain control. The beam width of radar is a measure of its discrimination (i.e., it determines the minimum angular separation that two targets can have and still be resolved). Two targets at the same range whose angular separations at the radar antenna exceed one-half of the beam width between half-power points, generally, will be resolved or distinguishable as two individual targets. The smaller the beam width, the greater the annular resolving power. Beam width may be at different locations through the axis, depending upon the shape of the antenna reflector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bazant and Oh [22] based on their experimental results, suggested to use a minimum beam width of three times maximum aggregate size (da) used in testing, as the width of fracture process zone of the concrete is three times maximum size of aggregate.
The 18 dBi antenna was also always questioned both for its narrow vertical beam width and also its horizontal beam width of "only" 65[degrees].
Based on the method, an exact analytical description of the variation of the RMS beam width is obtained.
the synthesized pattern is not of minimum beam width for a specified side lobe level.
Moreover the HPBW of each beam is reported in order to demonstrate the proper functioning of the proposed switched-beam antenna, in terms of overlapping area and beam width.
The Reactor TL taclight features Radiance lightbeam technology, which compresses energy into a wide, horizontal light field, with no energy wasted above or below the target area, and features more than twice the common beam width.
The second is the Lasar 40 active/passive system based on a network of arrays, the transmitter operating in the 30 to 45-kHz band with a horizontal beam pattern of 180[degrees], 270[degrees] or 360[degrees] for seabed mounting and jetty wall mounting, a vertical beam width of 3[degrees] to 10[degrees] and vertical beam steering of [+ or -] 10[degrees].
Aerial View also provides detailed numerical analysis of directivity, beam width, beam efficiency, vertical tilt, horizontal rotation, and more.
It offers a choice of light colour, beam width -- narrow and medium -- and is available as a complete range: surface-mounted, recessed, semi-recessed, wall-mounted and desktop.
Unlike microwave, however, MMW technology uses a narrow, one-degree beam width, so it has less potential for interfering with other signals than microwave, allowing for a simple and inexpensive licensing scheme.