References in classic literature ?
'Children, rejoice, eat and drink to your heart's content, we have won the battle!' But the young wrens said: 'We will not eat yet, the bear must come to the nest, and beg for pardon and say that we are honourable children, before we will do that.' Then the willow-wren flew to the bear's hole and cried: 'Growler, you are to come to the nest to my children, and beg their pardon, or else every rib of your body shall be broken.' So the bear crept thither in the greatest fear, and begged their pardon.
And this continued until the bear stood suddenly upright and cried aloud in pain, and thrashed his fore paws madly about.
And after a while the bear grew weak and tired, for he was very heavy and he had jumped about with exceeding violence, and he went off along the shore-ice, shaking his head slowly from side to side and sitting down ever and again to squeal and cry.
"But tell me," said Dorothy, "how did such a brave Champion happen to let the bears eat him?
"The Champion had killed eleven bears in his time," returned the unseen man; "and we know this is true because when any creature is dead the invisible charm of the dama-fruit ceases to be active, and the slain one can be plainly seen by all eyes.
"Why, boy," replied the veteran, "caution is caution, but one must not put up with too much, even from a bear. Would you have me suffer myself to be bullied all day by a varmint?"
- Scientific Explanation.- Impassable Defiles.- Black-Tailed Deer.-The Bighorn or Ahsahta.- Prospect From a Lofty Height.- Plain With Herds of Buffalo.- Distant Peaks of the Rocky Mountains.- Alarms in the Camp.- Tracks of Grizzly Bears.- Dangerous Nature of This Animal.- Adventures of William Cannon and John Day With Grizzly Bears.
The Keeper pretended to be adjusting the bear's collar, which gave him an opportunity of whispering, unheard by Uggug, "my fault, I'm afraid!
The bears seemed unusually troublesome and determined that time, and as we clambered slowly upward beyond the highest point to which we had previously attained, the cold became infinitely more intense.
Presently, with two great bears dogging our footsteps we entered a dense fog,
"Nay, nay, Sir John, you have gained as much honor as one man can bear, and it were hard if you could not rest now.
'The poor baron bore it all as long as he could, and when he could bear it no longer lost his appetite and his spirits, and sat himself gloomily and dejectedly down.