Bearded Seal


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Related to Bearded Seal: ringed seal

Bearded Seal

 

(Erignathus barbatus), a pinniped of the family Phocidae. It measures 2.2–2.6 m long and weighs 225–360 kg. The pelage is grayish brown, sometimes with a few light spots on the back; the pelage of the newborn is dark. The bearded seal inhabits the arctic regions of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the White, Barents, Kara, Chukchi, and Bering seas. It usually lives solitary in shallow waters and reproduces in the spring on drifting ice. It feeds on bottom invertebrates; more rarely, on fish. The bearded seal is a valuable object of commerce.

REFERENCES

Chapskii, K. Morskie zveri Sovetskoi Arktiki. Leningrad-Moscow, 1941.
Mlekopitaiushchie fauny SSSR, vol. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1963.
Krylov, V. I., G. A. Fedoseev, and A. P. Shustov. Lastonogie Dal’nego Vostoka. Moscow, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
George Olemaun, President of the Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope, explained, "The bearded seal is and has always been a part of our preparation for our whaling, as the skin for our boats and for our sustenance prepared for our seal oil and dried meat.
If the Ito cell number reflects the vitamin A exposure through marine prey species, mainly ringed seal and bearded seal (Ramsay and Stirling 1988), young bears would have lower numbers of Ito cells because they do not start eating prey rich in vitamin A until they are weaned at approximately 2 years of age (Derocher and Stirling 1994).
Viral and bacterial serology of six free-ranging bearded seals Erignathus barbatus.
But bearded seals and other animals that are adapted to ice eat similar foods.
But ice-adapted animals like bearded seals also eat similar foods.
The polar bear, longtime sustenance for the tribes of the area, wander pack ice in search of bearded seals.
Sandwiched between Alaska and the Eastern Arctic, the Inuvialuit homeland was rich in resources the people needed for survival: beluga and bow head whales, ringed and bearded seals, caribou, muskoxen, polar and grizzly bears.
Among the ice-associated (pagophilic) seals, ringed seals, Phoca hispida, occur in all of these ice types, bearded seals, Erignathus barbatus, typically occur in all but the shorefast ice, while ribbon seals, Phoca fasciata, and spotted seals are generally found only in the ice front from February to late April.
2) and many other pinnipeds (51 bearded seals, 8 ringed seals, 333 walruses, and 34 unidentified pinnipeds).
Pinniped sightings included 46 bearded seals, 32 ringed seals, 559 walruses, and 3 unidentified pinnipeds.
Other pinniped sightings included 9 bearded seals, 669 ringed seals, 1 Steller sea lion, 180 walruses, and 29 unidentified pinnipeds.
From the breathtaking valleys of the Grand Canyon, to up-close-and-personal meetings with giant whales and bearded seals, The Complete National Geographic brings vivid explorations of unique cultures, distant landscapes, and rare plants and animals to your computer screen with a simple click of the mouse.