Bearded Vulture

(redirected from bearded vultures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to bearded vultures: Gypaetus

Bearded Vulture

 

or lammergeier (Gypaëtus barbatus), a predatory bird of the hawk family. It has a length of up to 1.1 m and a wingspread of up to 2.7 m. The bird’s head and abdominal side are whitish or yellowish, and its back is blackish. Bristling feathers under the bill resemble a small beard (hence the bird’s name). The bearded vulture is found in the mountains of Asia, Africa, and southern Europe. In the USSR it is found in the Caucasus, Middle Asia, the Altai, and the Saians. It nests in cliff crevices and usually broods one egg at a time. The bearded vulture feeds on carrion, primarily bones. In Europe the numbers of bearded vultures are decreasing as the number of ungulates decreases.

References in periodicals archive ?
2009: Diet and food preferences of the endangered Bearded vulture Gypaetus barbatus: a basis for their conservation.
Soaring in the skies above are lammergeyer, or bearded vultures, frequently hauling massive bones into the air and dropping them to the ground so they shatter and expose their highly-coveted nutritious marrow.
High in the skies, lammergeyer - bearded vultures - ride the air currents, taking marrow-filled bones up into the sky before dropping them and smashing them on the ground below, exposing the juicy marrow.
Background: There are three large vulture species in Europe: the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus); black vulture (Aegypius monachos); and bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus).