bearing wall


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Related to bearing wall: Load bearing wall

bearing wall

[′ber·iŋ ‚wȯl]
(civil engineering)
A wall capable of supporting an imposed load. Also known as structural wall.

bearing wall

Supports any vertical load in addition to its own weight. See also: Wall

bearing wall

A wall capable of supporting an imposed load. Also called a structural wall or loadbearing wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
If one end of the bearing wall is perpendicular to another wall, you'll probably have to remove a stud in the other wall (Figure A and Photo 7).
Removing a bearing wall is a lot more work than removing a partition wall.
But you can use the same steps to replace just about any bearing wall.
Ceiling joists usually run at right angles over the top of a bearing wall. They support a lot of weight, so you'll need to temporarily brace these joists while you tear out the studs that currently support them and permanently replace the studs with a beam.
Answering yes to Question 2 under these circumstances doesn't always identify a bearing wall. For slab-built homes you have to ask an additional question.
If you want to move bearing walls away from the supports below, you can engineer the wood-I system to support the loads just as you would with solid sawn joists.
New steel skeletons were designed within the original envelope using existing bearing walls and wood trusses to support the roofs.
Its simple volume is defined by stone bearing walls built up in layers of rough hewn yellow-grey granite from Santiago de Compostela that seem neither monolithic nor massive because of the thinness, striation and texture of the blocks.
bearing walls or beams resting on columns, - roof structure over the main building is made of concrete elements as simply tensioned hollow tires with prestressed reinforcement.
will have a structural system of masonry bearing walls with precast concrete plank floors.
Concrete block bearing walls and a concrete plank floor system are used with exterior masonry walls and thermally broken, double-glazed windows.
Despite the inconvenience of construction crews stripping the lobby to its bearing walls, the Bernard Hodes advertising agency, which has occupied over 33,600 square feet in the building, has taken the entire 21st floor as an expansion space.