Bel

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Bel

(bāl, bĕl), deity of the Middle Eastern religionsMiddle Eastern religions,
religious beliefs and practices of the ancient inhabitants of the Middle East. Little was known about the religions of the city-states of W Asia until stores of religious literature were uncovered by excavations in the 19th and 20th cent.
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. The name is a cognate of that of BaalBaal
, plural Baalim
[Semitic,=master, lord], name used throughout the Bible for the chief deity or for deities of Canaan. The term was originally an epithet applied to the storm god Hadad.
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. For Bel in the Bible, see Bel and the DragonBel and the Dragon,
customary name for chapter 14 of the Book of Daniel, a passage included in the Septuagint and the Apocrypha. It was written possibly in the 1st cent. B.C. as a response to Gentile threat to the Jewish culture and state.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bel

 

the unit for a relative logarithmic quantity (the logarithm of the ratio between two physical quantities of the same name) that is used in electrical engineering, radio engineering, acoustics, and other branches of physics. It is designated by the letter B and is named after the American inventor of the telephone, A. G. Bell. The number of bels N, which corresponds to the ratio of two energy quantities P1 and P2 (which relate to power, energy, energy density, and so on), is expressed by the formula N = log (P1/P2); for “force” magnitudes F1 and F2 (voltage, current strength, pressure, field strength, and others), it is expressed as N = 2 log (F1/F2). The tenth part of a bel, called a decibel (dB), is usually used.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bel

[bel]
(physics)
A dimensionless unit expressing the ratio of two powers or intensities, or the ratio of a power to a reference power, such that the number of bels is the common logarithm of this ratio. Symbolized b; B.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bel

A unit of sound level which denotes the ratio between two quantities proportional to power; the number of bels equals the logarithm of this ratio, to the base 10; 1 bel=10 decibels.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bel

a unit for comparing two power levels, equal to the logarithm to the base ten of the ratio of the two powers.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

BEL

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

bell character

The control code used to sound an audible bell or tone in order to alert the user (ASCII 7, EBCDIC 2F).

deciBel

A unit of measurement of the loudness or strength of a signal. One deciBel is considered the smallest difference in sound level that the human ear can discern. Created in the early days of telephony as a way to measure cable and equipment performance and named after Alexander Graham Bell, deciBels (dBs) are a relative measurement derived from two signal levels: a reference input level and an observed output level. A deciBel is the logarithm of the ratio of the two levels. One Bel is when the output signal is 10x that of the input, and one deciBel is 1/10th of a Bel.

Sound Levels
A whisper is about 20 dB. A normal conversation is typically from 60 to 70 dB, and a noisy factory from 90 to 100 dB. Loud thunder is approximately 110 dB, and 120 dB borders on the threshold of pain. In 1883, the volcano on the Indonesian island of Krakatoa erupted. A hundred miles away, the sound level reached more than 170 dB, deafening everyone who survived. See dBm.
INCREASE IN POWER LEVELS (WATTS)Formula is dB=10*log(P1/P2)DeciBels   Output Signal Strength
       3dB           2x
       6dB           4x
      10dB (1 Bel)  10x
      20dB         100x
      30dB       1,000x
      40db      10,000x


   ATTENUATION OF AMPLITUDE (VOLTS or AMPS)Formula is dB=20*log(A1/A2)DeciBels   Output Signal Strength
      -3dB        0.707x
      -6dB        0.5x
     -10dB        0.316x
     -20dB        0.1x
     -30dB        0.032x
     -40db        0.010x



Bels and Bells
Quite a lot was named after Alexander Graham Bell. Throughout the 20th century, the Bell name was ubiquitous. It will live on with the deciBel.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For years Beaux Arts architects were considered uninspired copyists who imitated the grand buildings of Europe.
There isn't much Beaux Arts architecture in Sarasota.
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That Beaux's paintings show an interest in contemporary trends and styles in art is confirmed by her framing choices.
Beaux found her niche in the world of society portraits.
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The susceptible beau must also be handsome if possible--indeed it is better for all concerned that all beaux should be handsome; still, ugly susceptible <beaux> have been seen, but it is desirable--nay necessary, that their ugliness should be of <the> type kindly and considerately denominated "interesting." Insultingly ugly men should not attempt to be beaux at all; the old adage "handsome is, as handsome does--" is of no avail in this connection, and maybe flouted as a glittering generality--such men should worship only the blind goddess.(20)