becoming

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becoming

(in the philosophy of Aristotle) any change from the lower level of potentiality to the higher level of actuality
References in classic literature ?
Endearments had not yet become usual between them, and feeling himself morally inferior he felt terrified at this stage to use them to such an angel.
When once he had become interested in strange objects, and the way to use them, he began to explore various likely places for similar finds.
Darkness had no effect upon my fancy, and a churchyard was to me merely the receptacle of bodies deprived of life, which, from being the seat of beauty and strength, had become food for the worm.
As soon as you look at it with your eye on the edge on the table, you will find that it ceases to appear to you a figure, and that it becomes in appearance a straight line.
Among these 5,000 nebulae there is one which has received the name of the Milky Way, and which contains eighteen millions of stars, each of which has become the center of a solar world.
After this Hermod disappeared, and no one knew what had become of him; the Queen caused search to be made for him, but he could nowhere be found.
One would pronounce it an empire dismembered at the death of its Alexander, and whose provinces become kingdoms.
They waited a long time, for the private was in no hurry to become an ornament and made his guesses very slowly.
and thus new places in the natural economy of the country are left open for the old inhabitants to struggle for, and become adapted to, through modifications in their structure and constitution.
But in maintaining armed men there in place of colonies one spends much more, having to consume on the garrison all the income from the state, so that the acquisition turns into a loss, and many more are exasperated, because the whole state is injured; through the shifting of the garrison up and down all become acquainted with hardship, and all become hostile, and they are enemies who, whilst beaten on their own ground, are yet able to do hurt.
The tragedy called Irene which Johnson had brought with him to London was at length after twelve years produced by Garrick, who had by that time become a famous actor.
Ralph, having died intestate, and having no relations but those with whom he had lived in such enmity, they would have become in legal course his heirs.