bedrock

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bedrock

the solid unweathered rock that lies beneath the loose surface deposits of soil, alluvium, etc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bedrock

[′bed‚räk]
(geology)
General term applied to the solid rock underlying soil or any other unconsolidated surficial cover.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bedrock

The hard, solid rock at the earth’s surface or underlying surface soil; can be utilized as a firm foundation for a building.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Bedrock

A C++ class library for Macintosh user interface portability.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
At depths of 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 m, the p-y curves at the same elevation agree well with each other irrespective of the bedrock depth (H).
In this study, the effect of bedrock depth on the lateral behavior of piles was investigated using 3D finite difference analysis.
(1) The effect of the bedrock gradually diminished with increasing bedrock depth and eventually disappeared at bedrock depths of 10 m (10D) or greater.
In the A zone, broken-down are IR and MR, and overlying bedrock is stratified, detached part of the roof bedrock is deformed according to the elastoplastic law, and gradually moves its weight onto the goaf.
In zone B, bedrock that was deformed after bedrock stratification in zone A, fully transfers its weight into the goaf, and stratification occurs in the next "packet" of the roof bedrock.
Thickness of the packets will be determined by thickness of parting in the underworked massif and composing lithotypes of roof bedrock. More solid and thick homogeneous layers will be stable over a longer period.
1) was divided into three parts: (B1) an area with a thin Quaternary overburden around the Viru-Nigula-Kunda road, (B2) the Varudi bog, (B3) an area with a thin overburden at the bedrock rises south of the Varudi bog.
A total of 114 data points (boreholes, pits and outcrops) have been described on the GBM in the areas B1-B3, about half of them entering the bedrock. The description of the 33 m deep Varudi borehole in the sector B2 is unique: Lower Ordovician sandstones, shales and clays are covered by Late Pleistocene till (27 m) and Holocene peat (3 m), whereas the typical Middle Ordovician limestones found in the neighbouring boreholes are missing (Suuroja et al.
The interpretation of the GPR images consisted of determining the Quaternary sediment types and searching the contact between the Ordovician carbonate bedrock and overburden.