beeswax

(redirected from beeswaxing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.

beeswax:

see waxwax,
substance secreted by glands on the abdomen of the bee and known commonly as beeswax; also various substances resembling beeswax. Waxes are mixtures comprising chiefly esters of monohydroxy alcohols, besides other esters and free fatty acids, free alcohols, and higher
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Beeswax

 

a lipoid granular substance secreted by special glands on honeybees and several other insects. It consists of a mixture of esters (up to 75 percent), free fatty acids, and saturated hydrocarbons. It is rich in vitamin A (100 g of honeycomb beeswax contains 4,096 international units of vitamin A). The density is 0.956-0.969. Beeswax melts at a temperature of 62°-72°C. It is insoluble in water. It dissolves easily in ether, chloroform, benzene, gasoline, and turpentine oil.

Bees build honeycombs out of beeswax. Pure beeswax is used in the manufacture of artificial honeycomb; the less pure wax is used in technology. Beeswax is an ingredient of many medicinal ointments, plasters, and cosmetic creams.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

beeswax

[′bēz‚waks]
(materials)
Yellow to grayish-brown solid wax obtained from bee honeycombs by boiling and straining; used in floor waxes, waxed paper, and textile finishes and in pharmacy. Also known as yellow wax.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

beeswax

a. a yellowish or dark brown wax secreted by honeybees for constructing honeycombs
b. this wax after refining, purifying, etc., used in polishes, ointments, and for modelling
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005