behavior therapy

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behavior therapy

or

behavior modification,

in psychology, treatment of human behavioral disorders through the reinforcement of acceptable behavior and suppression of undesirable behavior. The technique had its roots in the work of Ivan PavlovPavlov, Ivan Petrovich
, 1849–1936, Russian physiologist and experimental psychologist. He was professor at the military medical academy and director of the physiology department at the Institute for Experimental Medicine, St. Petersburg, from 1890.
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, a Russian physiologist who observed that animals could be taught to respond to stimuli that might otherwise have no effect on them. B. F. SkinnerSkinner, Burrhus Frederic,
1904–90, American psychologist, b. Susquehanna, Pa. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1931, and remained there as an instructor until 1936, when he moved to the Univ. of Minnesota (1937–45) and to Indiana Univ.
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 developed the technique in the United States, using positive or negative reinforcers to encourage desirable behavior and punishments to discourage undesirable behavior. Behavior therapists believe that, in many cases, behaviors can be learned or unlearned through basic conditioning techniques; unlike traditional psychoanalysis, the method has little regard for the unconscious processes underlying personality disorders. Behavior therapy uses such techniques as aversive conditioning, where unwanted habits are paired with unpleasant stimuli, and systematic desensitization, where a stimulus that causes anxiety is paired with a pleasant one.
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behavior therapy

[bi′hāv·yər ‚ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A mode of therapy that focuses on altering observable and quantifiable behavior of an individual by means of systematic manipulation of environmental and behavioral variables that are thought to be functionally related to the individual's behavior.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The behavior therapists in the study made accommodations for the learners by offering user-centered selection of text and graphics for design options for the AT.
For this same reason, many behavior therapists consider traditional psychological tests to be of little help in identifying target behaviors in the process of behavior therapy (Martin & Pear, 1999).
Sylvia Wilson who co-founded Bark Busters with her husband Danny in Australia in 1989 said, “In 25 years this network of dog behavior therapists have trained over 1 million dogs.
This literature holds the key to dealing with many challenges that currently face behavior therapists working from a constructional perspective in their attempts to construct a helping process.
In fact, behavior therapists who work with children with emotional or behavioral problems often do not directly measure behavior to generate data for their clinical treatment (Spaulding, Bahl, & Hawkins, 1996).
is a Certified Pastoral Counselor and Intensively trained Dialectical Behavior Therapist (DBT) and Skills Trainer.
Getting ahead of the data: A threat to some behavior therapies The Behavior Therapist, 24(9), 189-193.
Johnson said, “I have a passion for my work as a cognitive behavior therapist and helping my clients make lasting changes in their lives.
Indeed, a behavior therapist who conducts a functional analysis and is open to examining the broad array of tools available for any intervention that best fits each client will maximize efficiency and efficacy in his/her treatments.
Like the mainstream behavior therapist, the FAP therapist still needs conceptual skills to define classes of responses involved in the client's problems and to specify target behaviors and related contingencies.
That is, parents become resistant to using the techniques offered by the behavior therapist until they begin to experience the benefit of those techniques in the child's behavior.
The behavior therapist must then actively program for generalization to the new stimulus by using techniques such as modeling and rehearsal, guiding the client through role playing or visualization to encourage new repertoires to be utilized in different situations.

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