behaviouralism

(redirected from behavioralists)

behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, on the one hand, behavioralists were engaged in the process of innovation that included not only the formulation of new methodologies and models of interpretation, but also conceptual, and sometimes linguistic pioneering.
Whereas behavioralists tend to see psychological solutions to informational limits, rationalist accounts include the ability of humans to realize their cognitive limitations and design institutions that overcome some of these problems (Boettke, Caceres, and Martin 2013).
Speaking generally, we can group the cognitive and volitional limitations identified by behavioralists into three categories: imperfect optimization, bounded self-control, and non-standard preferences.
When Hume famously described reason as a "slave to" passion, he was making a descriptive statement about human nature that echoes modern behavioralists, (298) one central to his (and James Madison's) theory of government.
Judicial Behavioralists Test the "Legal Model" of Judicial Decision Making, 26 L.
One factor ignored by commercial pollsters and academic behavioralists alike is the impact of non-voters.
We had to revisit the impact on families, colleagues, healthcare providers, behavioralists, program administrators and payors.
Ecological behavioralists suggest that lobsters clearly express fear, displeasure, and interests both in the wild and in the kitchen.
So far, various important generalizable characteristics have been identified, but behavioralists do not claim that they exist equally among all decisionmakers in all cases and under all conditions.
For example, the postbehavioral era emerged in the mid to late 1960s as some of the leading behavioralists began to question their own way of studying political science.
Judicial Behavioralists Test the "Legal Model " of Judicial Decision Making, 26 L.
We also show what the behavioralists must be loath to mention.